(one's) fair share (of something)

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(one's) fair share (of something)

All that one deserves, expects, or is entitled to, whether that be a good or a bad thing. Usually preceded by "more than" to indicate an excessive amount. Leave the rest for the others, you've had your fair share. That poor girl has had to endure more than her fair share of trauma at such a young age.
See also: fair, share
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

one's fair share

the amount of something that one is due relative to what other people are receiving. Let him take more. He didn't get his fair share. I want my fair share. You cheated me! Give me some more!
See also: fair, share
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

(more than) your fair ˈshare of something

(more than) the usual, expected or desired amount of something: I’ve had more than my fair share of problems recently, but now things seem to be getting better again.We’ve all paid our fair share except Delia, who’s never got any money.
See also: fair, of, share, something
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017
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References in classic literature ?
Give her her fair share of your praise, and how much do you leave for him?'
Summary: Madonna may well have had her fair share of chart success but it seems that she is still excited by a number one album.
And Val's gone to town too in her Cleopatra hairdo, making sure that she gets her fair share of the attention.
Well, actually, she gets considerably more than her fair share.
The cumulative upshot of the argument, therefore, is that each individual requires a fair share of health care to retain her fair share of opportunity.
Since that share may well have exceeded her fair share, it does not follow that she now has less than her fair share of opportunity.
To license the inference from loss of health to violation of equal opportunity, the argument has to establish that the opportunities an individual stands to lose with a loss of health will leave her with less than her fair share of opportunity.
In that case, a loss of health will indeed leave her with less than her fair share of opportunity.
As we saw at the beginning, a valid equal opportunity argument for universal access to health care has to establish that the opportunities an individual stands to lose with a loss of health will leave her with less than her fair share of opportunity.
The first step is the inference that anyone who suffers a loss of health also suffers a violation of her fair share of opportunity.
A flight attendant for a major airline, 35-year-old Montana has taken full advantage of her jet-set lifestyle and dated her fair share of interesting men.