helping


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helping hand

Assistance with a task, or a person who provides such assistance. I could really use a helping hand carrying all of these boxes downstairs. You've been such a helping hand with this dinner, I couldn't have done it without you!
See also: hand, helping

lend a hand

To help. A noun or pronoun can be used between "lend" and "a." If you can lend a hand, we could use some more help in the kitchen. Lend your mother a hand in the kitchen, will you?
See also: hand, lend

help a lame dog over a stile

obsolete To help or assist someone in need in some fundamental or basic way. He has so much money that it would be no effort at all for him to help a lame dog over a stile, but the man is adamant that not a penny of his fortune be used toward charity of any kind.
See also: dog, help, lame, over

there's no helping (something)

Some situation, fact, or piece of information cannot be ignored or avoided. Advocating for renewable energy is important, but there's no helping the fact that the world needs non-renewable energy sources as well. I've been trying to ignore this pain in my chest for over a week now, but there's no helping it: I need to see a doctor.
See also: helping, no

help out

1. To aid someone in doing something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "help" and "out." Can you help out with the bake sale? Oh sure, I can help you out with that.
2. To give or provide someone with something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "help" and "out." Any chance you can help me out with the name of a good plumber? If you need money for the tip, I can help you out with a few dollars.
3. To help someone or something to remove something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "help" and "out." Please help Grandma out of her coat.
4. To help someone or something to physically get out of some thing or place. A noun or pronoun can be used between "help" and "out." I had to help the scared dog out of the cage.
See also: help, out

pitch in and help

To volunteer to join in (with someone) to help out (with some task). Jim is always willing to pitch in and help with any housework that needs doing. We all pitched in and helped so that the house would be clean before Mom and Dad got home. The only way we'll get the project finished in time is if everyone pitches in and helps.
See also: and, help, pitch

help out

some place to help [with the chores] in a particular place. Would you be able to help out in the kitchen? Sally is downtown, helping out at the shop.
See also: help, out

help out (with something)

to help with a particular chore. Would you please help out with the dishes? I have to help out at home on the weekends.
See also: help, out

help someone (or an animal) out (of something)

 
1. to help someone or an animal get out of something or some place. Please help your grandmother out of the car. Please help the cat out of the carton.
2. to help someone or an animal get out of a garment. She helped the dog out of its sweater. I helped her out of her coat when we got inside.
3. to help someone or an animal get out of trouble. Can you please help me out of this mess that I got myself into? You are in a real mess. We will help you out.
See also: help, out

help (someone) out

to help someone do something; to help someone with a problem. I am trying to raise this window. Can you help me out? I'm always happy to help out a friend.
See also: help, out

*a helping hand

Fig. help; physical help, especially with the hands. (*Typically: get ~; need ~; give someone ~; offer ~; offer someone ~.) When you feel like you need a helping hand making dinner, just let me know.
See also: hand, helping

lend a hand

(to someone) Go to lend (someone) a hand.
See also: hand, lend

lend (someone) a hand

 and lend a hand (to someone)
Fig. to give someone some help, not necessarily with the hands. Could you lend me a hand with this piano? I need to move it across the room. Could you lend a hand with this math assignment? I'd be happy to lend a hand.
See also: hand, lend

helping hand

see under lend a hand.
See also: hand, helping

help out

Give additional assistance, as in I offered to help out with the holiday rush at the store. [Early 1600s]
See also: help, out

lend a hand

Also, lend a helping hand. Be of assistance, as in Can you lend them a hand with putting up the flag, or Peter is always willing to lend a helping hand around the house. [Late 1500s]
See also: hand, lend

help a lame dog over a stile

come to the aid of a person in need.
See also: dog, help, lame, over

a ˌhelping ˈhand

help: The new charity tries to offer a helping hand to young people who have become addicted to drugs.A helping hand would be very welcome at the moment.
See also: hand, helping

lend (somebody) a ˈhand (with something)

help somebody (to do something): I saw two men pushing a broken-down car along the road so I stopped to lend them a hand.She stayed with us for three weeks and didn’t once lend a hand with the housework!
See also: hand, lend

help out

v.
1. To assist someone in doing some work or activity: Our children always help us out with the chores. You can help out the neighbors by raking their leaves. This place is a mess—come help out.
2. To aid someone by providing something: We helped out my relatives by lending them money after the fire. When my neighbors needed a ladder to fix the roof, I helped them out. After the disaster, we helped out by donating money.
3. To assist someone emerging from something or some place: An assistant helped the injured man out of the car.
See also: help, out

pitch in (and help)

in. to volunteer to help; to join in completing a task. If more people would pitch in and help, we could get this job done in no time at all.
See also: and, help, pitch

lend a hand

To be of assistance.
See also: hand, lend
References in periodicals archive ?
Rather than have this particular chapter end on a note that may be discouraging to readers, particularly new counselors, Kottler includes steps professionals can take to protect themselves from burnout and from feeling discouraged in the helping process.
The client receiving help from the group responds by helping other members.