helping


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helping hand

Assistance with a task, or a person who provides such assistance. I could really use a helping hand carrying all of these boxes downstairs. You've been such a helping hand with this dinner, I couldn't have done it without you!
See also: hand, helping

lend a hand

To help. A noun or pronoun can be used between "lend" and "a." If you can lend a hand, we could use some more help in the kitchen. Lend your mother a hand in the kitchen, will you?
See also: hand, lend

help a lame dog over a stile

obsolete To help or assist someone in need in some fundamental or basic way. He has so much money that it would be no effort at all for him to help a lame dog over a stile, but the man is adamant that not a penny of his fortune be used toward charity of any kind.
See also: dog, help, lame, over

there's no helping (something)

Some situation, fact, or piece of information cannot be ignored or avoided. Advocating for renewable energy is important, but there's no helping the fact that the world needs non-renewable energy sources as well. I've been trying to ignore this pain in my chest for over a week now, but there's no helping it: I need to see a doctor.
See also: helping, no

help out

1. To aid someone in doing something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "help" and "out." Can you help out with the bake sale? Oh sure, I can help you out with that.
2. To give or provide someone with something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "help" and "out." Any chance you can help me out with the name of a good plumber? If you need money for the tip, I can help you out with a few dollars.
3. To help someone or something to remove something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "help" and "out." Please help Grandma out of her coat.
4. To help someone or something to physically get out of some thing or place. A noun or pronoun can be used between "help" and "out." I had to help the scared dog out of the cage.
See also: help, out

pitch in and help

To volunteer to join in (with someone) to help out (with some task). Jim is always willing to pitch in and help with any housework that needs doing. We all pitched in and helped so that the house would be clean before Mom and Dad got home. The only way we'll get the project finished in time is if everyone pitches in and helps.
See also: and, help, pitch

help out

some place to help [with the chores] in a particular place. Would you be able to help out in the kitchen? Sally is downtown, helping out at the shop.
See also: help, out

help out (with something)

to help with a particular chore. Would you please help out with the dishes? I have to help out at home on the weekends.
See also: help, out

help someone (or an animal) out (of something)

 
1. to help someone or an animal get out of something or some place. Please help your grandmother out of the car. Please help the cat out of the carton.
2. to help someone or an animal get out of a garment. She helped the dog out of its sweater. I helped her out of her coat when we got inside.
3. to help someone or an animal get out of trouble. Can you please help me out of this mess that I got myself into? You are in a real mess. We will help you out.
See also: help, out

help (someone) out

to help someone do something; to help someone with a problem. I am trying to raise this window. Can you help me out? I'm always happy to help out a friend.
See also: help, out

*a helping hand

Fig. help; physical help, especially with the hands. (*Typically: get ~; need ~; give someone ~; offer ~; offer someone ~.) When you feel like you need a helping hand making dinner, just let me know.
See also: hand, helping

lend a hand

(to someone) Go to lend (someone) a hand.
See also: hand, lend

lend (someone) a hand

 and lend a hand (to someone)
Fig. to give someone some help, not necessarily with the hands. Could you lend me a hand with this piano? I need to move it across the room. Could you lend a hand with this math assignment? I'd be happy to lend a hand.
See also: hand, lend

helping hand

see under lend a hand.
See also: hand, helping

help out

Give additional assistance, as in I offered to help out with the holiday rush at the store. [Early 1600s]
See also: help, out

lend a hand

Also, lend a helping hand. Be of assistance, as in Can you lend them a hand with putting up the flag, or Peter is always willing to lend a helping hand around the house. [Late 1500s]
See also: hand, lend

help a lame dog over a stile

come to the aid of a person in need.
See also: dog, help, lame, over

a ˌhelping ˈhand

help: The new charity tries to offer a helping hand to young people who have become addicted to drugs.A helping hand would be very welcome at the moment.
See also: hand, helping

lend (somebody) a ˈhand (with something)

help somebody (to do something): I saw two men pushing a broken-down car along the road so I stopped to lend them a hand.She stayed with us for three weeks and didn’t once lend a hand with the housework!
See also: hand, lend

help out

v.
1. To assist someone in doing some work or activity: Our children always help us out with the chores. You can help out the neighbors by raking their leaves. This place is a mess—come help out.
2. To aid someone by providing something: We helped out my relatives by lending them money after the fire. When my neighbors needed a ladder to fix the roof, I helped them out. After the disaster, we helped out by donating money.
3. To assist someone emerging from something or some place: An assistant helped the injured man out of the car.
See also: help, out

pitch in (and help)

in. to volunteer to help; to join in completing a task. If more people would pitch in and help, we could get this job done in no time at all.
See also: and, help, pitch

lend a hand

To be of assistance.
See also: hand, lend
References in periodicals archive ?
Helping them make reparations for their damage shows them that they need to learn appropriate lines of social connectedness and hopefully find some empathy in themselves when faced with the same choice next time.
In addition to helping make SOA a successful reality, BEAWorld delivers the latest information on infrastructure technologies including BEA Tuxedo BEA WebLogic, BEA AquaLogic and a Partner Showcase that highlights the latest and greatest from the extensive BEA partner community.
Two groups helping farmers and ranchers get back on their feet are the California Farm Bureau (CFBF) and the Santa Barbara County Farm Bureau (SBCFB).
government agency charged with helping communities prepare for and recover from natural and human-made disasters.
The experience taught her that 'by helping others you help yourself' and helped her to make peace with the world and herself.
Helping those underserved populations with dental needs has always been my passion while sustaining ties to the field of dentistry and dental assisting.
The ultimate goal of all of these efforts is not to find new ways of assistance, but in using the assistance that we give to empower ordinary Africans to start helping themselves to shape a better future for themselves.
At this point, the founder believes that in helping others, the group members were actually helping themselves in building up their confidence and ability to solve their own problems.
This function, along with Parallel Access Volumes, enables the ESS to process a high number ofI/Os in parallel, helping to dramatically improve performance for zSeries servers and enabling greater use of large volumes.
Now, new research is helping scientists learn more about what causes this disorder, and what can be done to help kids like Joseph succeed.
The mass media can play a very important role in helping cultivate the positive emotions in us.
Hoping to give her an outlet for her energy and help her acquire skills that would add meaning to her life, I offered her an opportunity to help others while helping herself.
All investigators responding to or helping in the investigation of a hate/bias crime must be caring and compassionate persons.
Security guards and elevator operators were killed helping others escape to safety.
Three new studies suggest that poor sleep may be helping fuel the national diabetes epidemic: