heed

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Related to heeded: trivialized

give heed to (something)

To listen carefully or pay close attention; to give ample or due consideration. You'd best give heed to his advice, or you might end up suffering the mistakes he made in the past. Give heed to your mother, she knows what she's talking about.
See also: give, heed

pay heed to (something)

To listen carefully or pay close attention; to give (something) ample or due consideration. You'd best pay heed to his advice, or you might end up suffering the mistakes he made in the past. Pay heed to your mother, she knows what she's talking about.
See also: heed, pay

pay heed to someone

to listen to and accommodate someone. You had better pay heed to your father! They are not paying heed to what I told them.
See also: heed, pay

take heed (of someone or something)

to be cautious with someone or something; to pay attention to someone or something. We will have to take heed of Wendy and see what she will do next. You will learn to take heed of these little signs that things are not going well.
See also: heed, take

give/pay ˈheed (to somebody/something)

,

take ˈheed (of somebody/something)

(formal) pay careful attention to somebody/something: They gave little heed to the rumours.I paid no heed at the time but later I had cause to remember what he’d said.
See also: give, heed, pay
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, product liability plaintiffs in New Jersey are not required to prove that they would have heeded a warning, unless the manufacturer successfully rebuts the presumption.
Soft Sheen Products, (24) the District of Columbia Court of Appeals also justified the heeding presumption on a public policy rationale, holding that requiring plaintiffs to prove that had an adequate warning been given, they would have read and heeded it, "would impose an impossible burden on the plaintiff, and would often prevent his recovery because of pure speculation on the part of the jury.
The court then added that real-world experience does not support the presupposition that if a warning was given, plaintiffs would have heeded it, stating that "warnings are everywhere in the modern world and often go unread or, where read, ignored.
It is one thing to presume that a person would have heeded a warning had it been given; it is another to presume that the person would have heeded a better warning when, in fact, he paid no attention to the warning given, which if followed would have prevented his injuries.
Under New Jersey law, the manufacturer can rebut the heeding presumption in two alternative ways in workplace situations--by proving that had an adequate warning been provided, the employee would not have heeded it or, alternatively, proving that the employer would not have read and heeded by taking precautions for employee safety or ensuring that employees would have read the warnings.
If the warning is inadequate, whether the plaintiff would have read and heeded the warning is speculative.
First, studies and real-world experience show that warnings go unread, making it pure conjecture that plaintiffs would have read and heeded warnings.