hedge


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to hedge: hedge fund, hedge bets

a hedge between keeps friendship green

Friendships are more likely to be successful when there is a level of space and privacy between the friends. The reason their friendship has lasted as long as it has is because they respect each other's privacy. A hedge between keeps friendship green.

hedge (one's) bets

To take an action in order to offset a potential future loss. I'm not too confident that I'll get the lead in the play, so I'm hedging my bets by trying out for several roles.
See also: bet, hedge

hedge against (something)

1. To take an action in order to offset a potential future loss. What can we do to hedge against possible financial losses?
2. To protect something against a potential future loss. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "hedge" and "against." What can we do to hedge our investments against possible losses?
See also: hedge

hedge in

1. To create an enclosure around someone or something with a hedge (a row of shrubs or small trees). A noun or pronoun can be used between "hedge" and "in." Look at what the neighbor's landscaper is doing—it's like they're trying to hedge us in!
2. To restrict or limit someone. A noun or pronoun can be used between "hedge" and "around." If you already signed a contract with them, I'm afraid you're hedged in.
See also: hedge

look as if (one) has been dragged through a hedge backward(s)

slang To look very disheveled or unkempt. Do I look OK, or do I look as if I've been dragged through a hedge backward? You need to comb your hair, because you right now look as if you had been dragged through a hedge backwards.
See also: been, drag, hedge, if, look, through

look as if (one) has been pulled through a hedge backward(s)

slang To look very disheveled or unkempt. Do I look OK, or do I look as if I've been pulled through a hedge backward? You need to comb your hair, because you right now look as if you had been pulled through a hedge backwards.
See also: been, hedge, if, look, pull, through

look like (one) has been dragged through a hedge backward(s)

slang To look very disheveled or unkempt. Do I look OK, or do I look like I've been dragged through a hedge backward? You need to comb your hair, because you right now look like you had been dragged through a hedge backwards.
See also: been, drag, hedge, like, look, through

look like (one) has been pulled through a hedge backward(s)

slang To look very disheveled or unkempt. Do I look OK, or do I look like I've been pulled through a hedge backward? You need to comb your hair, because you right now look like you had been pulled through a hedge backwards.
See also: been, hedge, like, look, pull, through

hedge against something

to do something to lessen the risk of something happening; to bet against something bad happening. I want to hedge against something going wrong in the stock market, so I have bonds in my portfolio, too. We will hedge against any risk we can detect.
See also: hedge

A hedge between keeps friendship green.

Prov. Your friendship will flourish if you and your friend respect each other's privacy. Lynne and I are the best of friends, but we often like to spend time apart. A hedge between keeps friendship green.

hedge one's bets

Fig. to reduce one's loss on a bet or on an investment by counterbalancing the loss in some way. Bob bet Ann that the plane would be late. He usually hedges his bets. This time he called the airline and asked about the plane before he made the bet. John bought some stock and then bet Mary that the stock would go down in value in one year. He has hedged his bets perfectly. If the stock goes up, he sells it, pays off Mary, and still makes a profit. If it goes down, he reduces his loss by winning the bet he made with Mary.
See also: bet, hedge

hedge someone in

Fig. to restrict someone. (See also hedge someone or something in.) Our decision hedged in the children so they could not have any flexibility. She hedged herself in by her own behavior.
See also: hedge

hedge someone or something in

to enclose someone or something in a hedge. (See also hedge someone in.) Their overgrown yard has almost hedged us in. Their bushes hedged in our yard.
See also: hedge

hedge something against something

Fig. to protect investments against a decline in value by making counterbalancing bets or investments. The investor hedged his portfolio against a drop in stock prices by buying some bonds. I have to hedge my bets against losing.
See also: hedge

hedge one's bets

Lessen one's chance of loss by counterbalancing it with other bets, investments, or the like. For example, I'm hedging my bets by putting some of my money in bonds in case there's another drop in the stock market . This term transfers hedge, in the sense of "a barrier," to a means of protection against loss. [Second half of 1600s]
See also: bet, hedge

hedge your bets

COMMON If you hedge your bets, you are careful not to commit yourself to one thing, so that you do not make a mistake whichever way the situation develops. The Rev James Reeves is hedging his bets on whether Clark is the leader the Church needs in troubled times. Political forecasters are hedging their bets about the likely outcome of this Saturday's Louisiana governor's race. Note: When bookmakers accept a large bet, they often try to protect themselves against heavy losses by laying bets with other bookmakers. This practice is called `hedging'.
See also: bet, hedge

hedge your bets

try to minimize the risk of being wrong or incurring loss by pursuing two courses of action at the same time.
Hedging your financial liabilities, especially bets or speculative investments, meant limiting your potential losses by also putting money on another outcome, in such a way as to balance, more or less, any potential loss on the initial transaction. In betting terms, this specifically means putting money on more than one runner in a race.
1992 Great Lakes Fisherman All three methods have their proponents, and most anglers are wise to hedge their bets by using more than one method.
See also: bet, hedge

ˌhedge your ˈbets

(informal) try to reduce the risk of losing your money, being wrong about something, etc. by choosing two or more courses of action at the same time: She’s invested her money in two quite different businesses, so she’s hedging her bets.
This idiom refers to putting money on more than one horse in a race to increase your chances of winning money.
See also: bet, hedge
References in periodicals archive ?
Hedges are the perfect habitat for plants like the dog rose and the honeysuckle, as these wild climbers and ramblers are supported by the hedge, but are not overshadowed by it.
Especially, wealthy people choose hedge funds as a means to manage their assets.
The Little Book on Hedge Funds is a book written by a veteran- an insider and a creator of a hedge fund.
Second, FASB has extended the deadline for when prospective tests must be performed, allowing these tests to be completed as much as three months after the hedge has been initiated.
Equally, if a neighbour's hedge is overhanging your garden, you are entitled to remove any branches that are straying across the boundary.
"A lot of banks that do hedge accounting today, they have massive P&L hits from ineffectiveness," van Roosmalen said, and noted that under the new FASB standard, "you no longer have to record ineffectiveness on eligible cash flow hedges."
By contrast there were only small changes on the long side of the market, with hedge funds adding 3 million barrels of crude and 0.15 million barrels of gasoline contracts.
Looming over the event this year was the cloud of doubt that has darkened the hedge fund world over the past year.
Liquid alts were designed to appeal to retail investors who want the potential of hedge fund-like performance without hedge funds' famous appetite for risk.
Rampini, Sufi, and Viswanathan (2014) find that airlines which are financially vulnerable hedge less than those airlines with stronger balance sheets.
The reasoning for their withdrawal is emblematic of their ongoing debate surrounding hedge fund fees in recent years.
A hedge, nevertheless, has to be preferred to a fence, affording privacy, protection from the wind, reduced traffic noise and contrasting backdrop for flowering plants.
Summary: The salaries being paid by hedge funds are increasing from already high levels.