heavy

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heavy

1. n. a villain. (Especially in movies, etc.) He is well known for playing heavies in the movies.
2. mod. important; profound; serious. I have some heavy things to talk over with you, Sam.
3. mod. really fine. This is a real heavy thing you’re doing for me.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The link between ACEs, alcohol and violence was especially pronounced in young men aged 18-29, with 62% of those with high levels of ACEs who are heavier drinkers having hit someone in the previous 12 months.
At the Coast, the rains will be relatively heavier on Thursday and Saturday.
The following exercises are great movements to use heavier weights with.
Forecasters warn showers will affect the country from early this morning becoming heavier as the day goes on.
And he would have to give up some speed using the heavier broadhead.
cigarette smokers would like to quit, but heavier smokers are less likely to say this than lighter smokers.
When these stars exploded into supernovae, they spread much heavier elements through space, and so on and so forth until heavy elements like oxygen, carbon and silicon were created.
The elastic ankle band is a slightly heavier material with a Velcrohook overlock piece so it doesn't get unfastened unintentionally.
Heavier threads will be more visible than lightweight threads.
Christine Mitchell My friends want to book a summer holiday for July but I am 2st heavier than all of I am 2st heavier than all of them and I am dreading it.
Adolescents with heavier use--defined in the study as self-reported lifetime use of cannabis 50 times or more by age 15--had a modest 2.9% decrease in educational performance on a compulsory school exam given at age 15 or 16, compared with never-users.
SPANDAU SPANDAU Ballet are still going for Gold after 35 going for Gold after 35 years - despite appearing years - despite appearing slightly heavier. slightly heavier.
* Heavier people had a higher risk of leukemia as well as cervical, colon, gallbladder, kidney, liver, ovarian, uterine, and postmenopausal breast cancers than leaner people.
Heavier vehicles more effectively protect passengers, says Russ Rader, spokesman for the Arlington, Va.-based Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.