hearing


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Related to hearing: hearing loss, Hearing test
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a fair hearing

The chance to present one's argument or explanation about an alleged crime or wrongdoing, especially in a courtroom. All we ask is for a fair hearing—to present our evidence without prejudice by judge or jury.
See also: fair, hearing

hard of hearing

Describing someone whose ability to hear is limited. Grandpa is hard of hearing, so be prepared to speak loudly or repeat yourself a lot.
See also: hard, hearing, of

hear (one) loud and clear

1. To be clearly able to hear and understand what one is saying over the telephone or radio. Yes, ground control, I hear you loud and clear. We're hearing you loud and clear, Reggie. You can go ahead and bring your rig into the station.
2. To understand exactly what one means. I heard you loud and clear, Janet—first secure the deal, and then worry about the details. A: "Do you understand why this is so important?" B: "Yes, yes, I hear you loud and clear."
See also: and, clear, hear, loud

hear (something) straight from the horse's mouth

To obtain information from the original or most reliable source. A: "Is our test really getting rescheduled?" B: "Yep, I heard the news straight from the horse's mouth! Mrs. Whitford told me this morning." You shouldn't believe anything you hear about the company unless you hear it straight from the horse's mouth.
See also: hear, mouth, straight

hear (something) through

To listen to something in its entirety. I know you're already angry, but please hear my apology through.
See also: hear, through

hear from (one)

1. To receive a message from one. A: "Do you ever hear from Tom?" B: "No, not since he moved." When can we expect to hear from the lawyer? If you don't hear from me in the next day or two, then proceed as we agreed.
2. To be scolded or lectured by one (for some wrongdoing). Ugh, I'm definitely going to hear from my parents when they see my bad grades this semester. Expect to hear from the government if you decide to skip out on paying your taxes.
3. To be told something by a specific person. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "hear" and "from." A: "Who told you there were going to be layoffs?" B: "I heard it from Sarah." I heard a really interesting lecture from a man who sold all his possessions so he could travel around the world.
See also: hear

hear of (someone or something)

1. To know of someone or something. Last week, I'd never even heard of that actress, and now, I'm seeing her everywhere!
2. To learn of someone or something. Michael has a new girlfriend? Why haven’t I heard of this?
3. To consider something or allow something (to happen). In this usage, the phrase is typically used negatively to emphasize that one will not consider or allow something to happen. A: "I'd like to pay for dinner to thank you for your generosity." B: "I won't hear of it, my boy! You are our guest." My mother wouldn't hear of us going to an out-of-state college.
See also: hear, of

hear out

To listen to and consider the entirety of what one has to say, often when the listener is reluctant to do so. A noun or pronoun can be used between "hear" and "out." I know you don't want to change our plans, but hear me out—if we go to the beach on Saturday instead of Friday, we can probably avoid this storm. The board of directors said they're willing to hear us out. Please just hear out his arguments before you make any final decisions.
See also: hear, out

hear word (from someone or something)

To receive or be given a message or communication (from someone or something). We're hearing word from police that the suspect is moving south on Broadway in a white pickup truck. Please let me know if you hear word from Aunt Marie—I'm starting to worry about her.
See also: hear, someone, word

hearing things

Having auditory hallucinations. Bob: "Listen, I'm sure that someone is right behind us!" Jack: "Bob, you're hearing things. There's nothing out here but us and the wind."
See also: hearing, thing

hearing-impaired

Deaf or partially deaf. Some deaf people advocate the avoidance of this term in favor of the more straightforwardly descriptive terms “deaf” and “hard of hearing.” Grandpa is hearing-impaired, so be prepared to speak loudly or repeat yourself a lot.

in hearing distance

Close enough to clearly hear what someone says or does. They didn't realize I was in hearing distance when they were discussing my performance in school. Let's step outside—I don't want to fight while they're in hearing distance.
See also: distance, hearing

within hearing distance

Close enough to clearly hear what someone says or does. They didn't realize I was within hearing distance when they were discussing my performance in school. Let's step outside—I don't want to fight while they're within hearing distance.
See also: distance, hearing, within
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

hard of hearing

[of someone] unable to hear well or partially deaf. Please speak loudly. I am hard of hearing. Tom is hard of hearing, but is not totally deaf.
See also: hard, hearing, of

hear someone out

 
1. Lit. to hear all of what someone has to say. (Fixed order.) Please hear me out. I have more to say. Hear out the witness. Don't jump to conclusions.
2. Fig. to hear someone's side of the story. (Fixed order.) Let him talk! Hear him out! Listen to his side! We have to hear everyone out in this matter.
See also: hear, out

hearing impaired

Euph. deaf or nearly deaf. This program is closed-captioned for our hearing-impaired viewers. His mother happens to be hearing impaired, so he learned to sign at an early age.
See also: hearing, impaired
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

hard of hearing

Somewhat deaf, having a partial loss of hearing. For example, You'll have to speak distinctly; Dad's a little hard of hearing. The use of hard in the sense of "difficulty in doing something" survives only in this expression. [Mid-1500s]
See also: hard, hearing, of

hear out

Listen to someone's discourse until the end, allow someone to speak fully, as in Please hear me out before you jump to any conclusions. [First half of 1600s]
See also: hear, out
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

a fair ˈhearing

the opportunity for somebody to give their point of view about something before deciding if they have done something wrong, often in a court of law: I’ll see that you get a fair hearing.
See also: fair, hearing

hard of ˈhearing

unable to hear well: He’s become rather hard of hearing.The television programme has subtitles for the hard of hearing.
See also: hard, hearing, of

in/within (somebody’s) ˈhearing

near enough to somebody so that they can hear what is said: She shouldn’t have said such things in your hearing.
See also: hearing, within
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

hear out

v.
To listen to someone without interrupting: Hear me out, I have something important to say. I heard the mediator out, but I didn't agree.
See also: hear, out
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

hard of hearing

1. Having a partial loss of hearing.
2. People who have partial loss of hearing, considered as a group.
See also: hard, hearing, of
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
- The analysis of the global hearing aids market provides market sizing and growth opportunities for the forecast period 2019-2024.
Dr Rajput said that deafness or low hearing is either by birth or acquired, adding, the three stages of the problem range from mild, moderate to severe loss of hearing.
The app was launched on Sunday by the World Health Organization and on Monday in Kenya during the World Hearing Day at Kenyatta National Hospital.
Although the brain naturally becomes smaller with age, the shrinkage seems to be fast-tracked in older adults with hearing loss, according to the results of a study from Johns Hopkins and the National Institute on Aging.
They suggest that the federal government expand Medicare and/or Medicaid coverage of hearing care services.
Adnan Shennib, founder of iHEAR, has 27 years of experience in hearing aid innovations.
I find that my hearing aids have made conversations at home much more intelligible (albeit less amusing!), and I no longer have to focus intently on figuring out what others are saying.
The US FDA granted marketing authorisation of the Bose Hearing Aid device to Bose Corporation.
The reason for the typical hearing aid shape is due to necessity, a result of having to fit the round, coin-shaped batteries inside the casing.
Hearing impairment may be ranked as mild, moderate, moderately severe, severe or profound: Mild: between 26 and 40 dB HL for adults, and between 20 and 40 dB HL for children; Moderate: between 41 and 54 dB HL; Moderately severe: between 55 and 70 dB HL; Severe: between 71 and 90 dB HL; Profound: 91 dB HL or greater; and Totally Deaf: Have no hearing at all.
Come and join us for a chat You are welcome to come along and talk to our fully qualified,and registered Hearing AidaUDIOLOGIST over a cup of coffee.You can take advantage of OURunique 'Lifestyle HearingAssessment' and try out thevery latest in 'IntelligentHearing Technology' ...
In recognition of World Hearing Day, held each year on March 3, Hamad Medical Corporation (HMC) is holding this week a number of events to raise awareness about the rising global prevalence of hearing loss and the importance of preventative actions to protect one's hearing.