hear of (someone or something)

(redirected from hear of someone)

hear of (someone or something)

1. To know of someone or something. Last week, I'd never even heard of that actress, and now, I'm seeing her everywhere!
2. To learn of someone or something. Michael has a new girlfriend? Why haven’t I heard of this?
3. To consider something or allow something (to happen). In this usage, the phrase is typically used negatively to emphasize that one will not consider or allow something to happen. A: "I'd like to pay for dinner to thank you for your generosity." B: "I won't hear of it, my boy! You are our guest." My mother wouldn't hear of us going to an out-of-state college.
See also: hear, of
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

hear of someone or something

to learn of the existence of someone or something. Did you ever hear of such a thing? I have heard of Sharon Wallace and I would like to meet her.
See also: hear, of
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

hear of

Be informed about, as in I'd never heard of that jazz singer before, but she was very good. [Late 1500s] Also see not have it (hear of it).
See also: hear, of
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

not ˈhear of something

not allow something to happen: ‘May I pay for the phone call?’ ‘Don’t be silly! I wouldn’t hear of it!’He won’t hear of his daughter becoming a police officer. He thinks it’s much too dangerous.
See also: hear, not, of, something
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

hear of

v.
1. To know of the existence of someone or something: Have you ever heard of this basketball player?
2. To receive news about something or someone: This is the first I've heard of your decision. She was last heard of somewhere abroad.
3. To consider, permit, or consent to something. Used only in the negative: I won't hear of your going!
See also: hear, of
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
In an age when teenage celebrities publish ghosted kiss 'n tell autobiographies and even children expose themselves on social media it's good to hear of someone famous who knows the value of discretion.
"Many of the people in this area are involved in fishing and the likes so it is terrible to hear of someone dying at sea."
We hear of some people receiving honorary university degrees, but rarely do we hear of someone receiving an honorary passport.
Mum-of four Jill French, 41, a healthcare worker of Holy Cross, said: "It is really shocking to hear of someone dying at this beauty spot.
Ms Oatley said: "I would just like parents to be aware of what happened to us and to tell school friends that if they hear of someone talking that way - the way that Joshua Davies did - let an adult know so they can keep an eye out."
Isobel Ross, chairwoman of Forfar Community Council, said: "It is not every day you hear of someone like Sigourney Weaver wanting to visit your town.
IT'S always heartbreaking when you hear of someone dying...
Never a day goes past, without we hear of someone being mugged, a twoccer running someone over, a house raided for drugs and the occupants arrested, and so on.
How grand to hear of someone who manages to get rubbed the right way almost as much as he gets to fill his belly with the "leftovers" (from gourmet to godawful) of a whole town.
One said: "It's a terrible shame, you never want to hear of someone being hurt like that."
When I hear of someone else losing a child this way, I know the torture they are going through and it is happening far too often
Meanwhile, the Kwak'wala Hymnal is being distributed through the cultural society "when we hear of someone going to a community, to go clam digging or just returning by plane or boat--we ask them to take a box in for us." That is how the community of Kingcome got its new hymnals recently, Ms.
But when did you ever hear of someone in hospital after taking an overdose of dope?
Comment OF THE DAY WHILE many of us hear of someone scooping the lottery and secretly wish it was us, it's clear that there are no more deserving winners than Chris and Colin Weir.
I would rather hear a ball being kicked about, annoying as it is, than hear of someone being robbed, burgled, or worse.