heal

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heal (someone) of (something)

To cure someone of a particular ailment (named after "of"); to restore someone's health. My doctor seems to think that only a surgeon can heal me of this back pain.
See also: heal, of

heal over

To heal or mend, usually of an injury or wound that has broken the skin. The doctor didn't' t give me stitches because he thinks my cut will heal over pretty quickly on its own.
See also: heal, over

heal up

1. To heal or mend, as of a wound or injury. The doctor didn't give me stitches because he thinks my cut will heal up pretty quickly on its own. Will it really take three months for my broken leg to heal up?
2. To recover or be restored to health following an injury or illness. The injured player spent most of the season healing up. Don't worry, we'll make sure your shifts are covered. You just stay home and heal up.
3. To repair or restore someone or something to health. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "heal" and "up." This ointment will help heal up that cut a lot quicker. Don't worry, the medical team here will heal you up in no time.
See also: heal, up

physician, heal thyself

proverb Do not rebuke or correct someone else for the very faults or problems of which you yourself are guilty. A: "You coddle Tommy way too much—you need to be stricter with him!" B: "Me? You give in to every demand he makes. Sheesh—physician, heal thyself!"
See also: heal, thyself

time heals all wounds

proverb Emotional pain lessens over time. I know it's hard to consider now, as you're grieving, but time heals all wounds. I'm sure you will reconcile with Kathleen eventually. After all, time heals all wounds.
See also: all, heal, time, wound

well-heeled

Wealthy. The foundation relies on big donations from well-heeled citizens.
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

heal over

[for the surface of a wound] to heal. The wound healed over very quickly, and there was very little scarring. I hope it will heal over without having to be stitched.
See also: heal, over

heal someone of something

to cure someone's ailments. Are you the doctor who healed me of my wounds? Can any doctor heal us of a common cold?
See also: heal, of

heal up

[for an injury] to heal. The cut healed up in no time at all.
See also: heal, up

Physician, heal thyself.

Prov. Do not rebuke someone for a fault or problem you have yourself. (Biblical.) Ellen: You're such a spendthrift. You should go on a strict budget. Fred: But you manage money even worse than I do! Physician, heal thyself. Jane: You look like you're gaining weight. You should probably get more exercise. Alan: Physician, heal thyself. You're getting a little pudgy, too.
See also: heal, thyself

well-heeled

 and well-fixed; well-off
Fig. wealthy; with sufficient money. My uncle can afford a new car. He's well-heeled. Everyone in his family is well-off.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

physician, heal thyself

before attempting to correct others, make sure that you aren't guilty of the same faults yourself. proverb
This expression alludes to Luke 4:23: ‘And he said unto them, Ye will surely say unto me this proverb, Physician, heal thyself: whatsoever we have heard done in Capernaum, do also here in thy country’.
See also: heal, thyself
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

well-fixed

and well-heeled
1. mod. rich. His father died and left him pretty well-fixed.
2. and well-healed mod. alcohol intoxicated. You might say he is well-heeled. You might say he’s dead drunk, too.

well-heeled

verb

well-healed

verb
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In her groundbreaking work on experiencing, describing, and witnessing trauma, Cathy Caruth explains: what seems to be suggested by Freud in Beyond the Pleasure Principle is that the wound of the mind--the breach in the mind's experience of time, self, and the world--is not, like the wound of the body, a simple and healable event, but rather an event that ...
If beneath appearances, Silone was a real secret police informer, then that would be only a comment on the hateful demands totalitarianism makes on the individual--or to put it another way, some wounds to the human soul go deep, too deep to be understood, let alone healable. Outwardly Silone lived his life as an anti-fascist and an anti-Communist.
With the development of tough hydrogels, ionic conductive hydrogels with enhanced mechanical properties and other healable functions were developed by doping salt (e.g., NaCI and LiCl) in the current tough hydrogels or the salt ions also participate in physical crosslinking [2, 23-25].
"Every single problem I ever have is healable by Taylor Swift!" Gomez told (http://www.seventeen.com/celebrity/a5958/selena-gomez-interview/) Seventeen about her dear friend.
Wudl, "The world of smart healable materials," Progress in Polymer Science, vol.
Such supramolecular materials have been targeted toward applications that include healable plastics, responsive liquid crystalline polymers, chemical sensors, thermally responsive hydrogels, shape memory materials and mechanically dynamic biomedical implants.
the wound of the mind [...] is not, like the wound of the body, a simple and healable event, but rather an event that [...] is experienced too soon, too unexpectedly, to be fully known and is therefore not available to consciousness until it imposes itself again, repeatedly, in the nightmares and repetitive actions of the survivor.
In exploring the roots of the Southern Stoicism which is so much a part of the work of both William Alexander and Walker Percy, Lewis Lawson quotes Thomas Jefferson: "Epictetus and Epicurus give laws for governing ourselves, Jesus a supplement of the duties and charities we owe others."(3) This, simply put, is the problem Percy presents; this separation of the imperatives of the secular stoic and religious traditions creates a serious though healable rift in the Southern consciousness.