headline

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catch (the) headlines

To be featured on the headlines of news articles, as due to being particularly important, popular, fashionable, etc. It may not be so tremendous as to catch the headlines, but this small change in immigration law could have a huge impact on foreign workers. The pop star caught headlines yesterday after his latest run-in with police.
See also: catch, headline

grab (the) headlines

To be featured in the headlines of news articles, as due to being particularly newsworthy, important, popular, fashionable, etc. It may not be so tremendous as to grab the headlines, but this small change in immigration law could have a huge impact on foreign workers. The pop star grabbed headlines yesterday after his latest run-in with police.
See also: grab, headline

hit (the) headlines

To be featured on the headlines of news articles, as due to being particularly important, popular, fashionable, etc. It may not be so tremendous as to hit the headlines, but this small change in immigration law could have a huge impact on foreign workers. The pop star hit headlines yesterday after his latest run-in with police.
See also: headline, hit

hit the headlines

To appear prominently in media reports. We need to have all the marketing materials ready before the merger hits the headlines.
See also: headline, hit

make (the) headlines

To be featured on the headlines of news articles, as due to being particularly important, popular, fashionable, etc. It may not be so tremendous as to make the headlines, but this small change in immigration law could have a huge impact on foreign workers. The pop star made headlines yesterday after his latest run-in with police.
See also: headline, make

the headlines

The titles of the news articles in a particular issue of a newspaper or in many periodicals on one day or over a period of time. The term is usually used to represent the main themes of the news being covered. Let's read the headlines and see what's new in the world today. Once the press gets wind of this scandal, it will be in the headlines for weeks.
See also: headline

grab the headlines

or

grab headlines

If someone or something grabs the headlines or grabs headlines, they get a lot of attention in the newspapers, on TV, etc. He is not among the players who have been grabbing the headlines this season. His visit to the US is bound to grab headlines.
See also: grab, headline

hit the headlines

be written about or given attention as news.
See also: headline, hit

grab/hit/make the ˈheadlines

(informal) be an important item of news in newspapers or on the radio or television: His reputation has suffered a lot since the scandal over his love affair hit the headlines.
See also: grab, headline, hit, make
References in periodicals archive ?
Okoth's death was relegated to a above-the-masthead smaller headline ("Ken Okoth loses battle with cancer").
It is hard for me to read some of the reaction to a derided New York Times headline without a smirk, a sigh and a forlorn shake of the head.
Headline: Palace to opposition, shun publicity stunts
"Part of the reason I came up with the idea to do a table talk about social headlines was I didn't have a good sense of what to tell people what could be a good one, other than knowing it when I saw it," Grovum said.
"Please disregard the headlines that ran on Dow Jones Newswires between 9:34 a.m.
The system looks for commonly used phrases in clickbait headlines, similar to how filters for email spam work, Facebook said in a blog post.
What if we swap, in our minds, the ideas of catchy headlines and bold promises?
Several of his former colleagues over the years recalled how the headline may not have been what it became.
In a traditional newspaper, the headline serves two purposes.
Information is limitless in globalized world, and New Yorker report suggests that accurate headlines are more essential than ever before
ONE of the most common misconceptions is that reporters write their own headlines. This was underlined to me this week when Wrexham FC reporter Mark Currie took a bit of a barracking on an on-line web forum for a headline he didn't write about the Dragons being out-muscled in the transfer market.
I think there is a direct connection between the two contrasting headlines as, apparently, sexually abusing 14-year-old girls does not warrant a jail sentence in this country?
Chances are you've received one of those viral emails spotlighting poorly written headlines: "Something Went Wrong with Jet Crash, Experts Say," "War Dims Hope for Peace," "Police Begin Campaign to Run Down Jaywalkers." Well, at least those are amusing.
Integrated in the journalistic discourse, headlines are very specific structural units of any newspaper text.
The present article aims to rxplore the functions of the directive illocutionaryacts in CNN headlines written about Pakistan.