heading


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head south

1. To escape; to vanish or disappear. (Not necessarily in a southerly direction.) Everyone in the gang headed south when they learned that the police had discovered their hideout.
2. To fall or drop; to depreciate; to lose quality or value. (Especially related to finances or stock exchanges.) The company's stock profile continued heading south for the third day in a row today. I used to be a big player in the stock market, but all my investments have headed south lately.
3. To cease working or functioning; to quit, fail, or fall apart. Talks between the labor union and the construction firm headed south yesterday, so it looks like workers will be on strike again soon. My computer is only a month old, and it's already heading south.
See also: head, south

head for a fall

To take actions that will likely result in a problem or conflict, typically due to one's past behavior. With the way he keeps skipping school, he is definitely headed for a fall. Oh, Jennifer is heading for a fall—you can't start rumors about half the school without repercussions.
See also: fall, head

head for the hills

1. To move to higher ground, as in preparation for or response to a natural disaster. There are bound to be tsunamis after an earthquake like that. We'd better head for the hills!
2. To flee hastily; to clear out or depart quickly. You better head for the hills before mom comes home and sees what you did to her car. The bandits all headed for the hills when they heard the marshall was riding into town.
See also: head, hill

be heading for a fall

To be taking actions that will likely result in a problem or conflict, typically due to one's past behavior. With the way he keeps skipping school, he is definitely heading for a fall. Oh, Jennifer is heading for a fall—you can't start rumors about half the school without repercussions.
See also: fall, heading

head off to (some place)

To leave for a particular place. Louise just headed off to the store, but you can probably still catch her, if you leave now.
See also: head, off

head off

1. To try to stop something from happening. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "head" and "off." I'm calling the editor now to head off this story before they print it.
2. To intercept or seize someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "head" and "off." Can you head mom off before she comes home and catches us having a party here?
3. To leave for a particular place. Louise just headed off to the store, but you can probably still catch her, if you leave now.
See also: head, off

head for the hills

 and take to the hills; run for the hills 
1. Lit. to flee to higher ground. The river's rising. Head for the hills! Head for the hills! Here comes the flood!
2. Fig. to depart quickly. Here comes crazy Joe. Run for the hills. Everyone is heading for the hills because that boring Mr. Simpson is coming here again.
See also: head, hill

head someone or something off

Fig. to intercept and divert someone or something. I think I can head her off before she reaches the police station. I hope we can head off trouble. We can head it off. Have no fear.
See also: head, off

head off

Block the progress or completion of; also, intercept. For example, They worked round the clock to head off the flu epidemic, or Try to head him off before he gets home. [First half of 1800s] This expression gave rise to head someone off at the pass, which in Western films meant "to block someone at a mountain pass." It then became a general colloquialism for intercepting someone, as in Jim is going to the boss's office-let's head him off at the pass.
See also: head, off

be heading for a fall

or

be riding for a fall

If a person or an organization is heading for a fall or is riding for a fall, they are doing things that make them likely to have problems or to fail soon. The Tory Party is heading for a great fall. Here was a company that seemed to be riding for a fall. Now, it has become the sixth-biggest firm in the market. Note: You can also say that a person or organization is headed for a fall. There were some who wondered whether Black's vanity indicated that he was headed for a fall. Note: This expression was probably first used in fox-hunting to refer to someone who was riding dangerously.
See also: fall, heading

head south

or

go south

INFORMAL
If something heads south or goes south, it becomes less successful or falls to a lower level. At that point, the stock market headed south. Managers were selling shares in the certain knowledge that the company was going south.
See also: head, south

head for (or take to) the hills

run away; decamp.
2003 The Press (York) Marisa fears Marshall will head for the hills as soon as he discovers this elegant young woman's true identity.
See also: head, hill

head south

deteriorate.
2008 Newsweek Many months ago, McCain remarked, honestly, that he didn't know much about economics. As the economy heads south, he is routinely reminded of his candor.
See also: head, south

head off

v.
1. To depart for some destination: She's heading off to New York City next week. He headed off for the mountains for his annual vacation.
2. To intercept or divert someone or something: Try to head them off before they get home. The sheriff headed off the gangsters at the pass.
3. To block the progress or completion of something: The town headed off the attempt to build another mall. The city council wanted to pass a restrictive zoning ordinance, but the mayor headed them off.
See also: head, off

head South

verb
See also: head, south

turtle heading

n. popping up and down in an office cubicle, looking at what’s going on in the rest of the office. (see also prairie dog.) Everybody was turtle heading, trying to see what was happening in Willy’s cubicle.
See also: heading, turtle
References in periodicals archive ?
Although accidental injuries cannot be eliminated from sports, especially those involving contact, evidence of brain injury caused by a deliberate action would likely lead in a shift in attitudes towards heading," he adds.
Despite these results, the link between heading and brain damage is controversial.
I think the risk [of mental impairment] from concussion is real, but I'm not convinced by the available information on repetitive heading," he says.
He is not yet convinced that heading should be banned from even youth soccer.
Whether or not researchers think there's good evidence that heading causes mental impairment, they all agree that the issue needs to be resolved quickly because of the game's popularity.
One specific question is, How does heading affect players who have recently suffered a concussion?
Heading skills must be practiced at all levels, right up through college and the professionals.
The Penn State Sports Medicine Newsletter encourages (1) limiting heading for young players, (2) using a smaller, lighter, higher-quality ball, and (3) changing balls in wet weather.
To everyone who believes that heading a soccer ball is too dangerous, we point to the great professional defenders who headed tens of thousands of balls with no ill effect.
Coaches should make certain to train their players in how to jump, as game situations often dictate a heading action off a jump.