draw a veil over (something)

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draw a veil over (something)

To conceal something, usually by not talking about it. Can we please draw a veil over that stupid rumor about me? It's not true, but I want as few people to hear about it as possible. I tried to draw a veil over my inexperience so that the recruiter would seriously consider me for the job.
See also: draw, over, veil
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

draw a veil over

Conceal or avoid discussing something; keep from public knowledge. For example, Louise drew a veil over the accounting errors. [c. 1700]
See also: draw, over, veil
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

draw a veil over something

If you draw a veil over something, you deliberately do not talk about it because you want to keep it private or because it is embarrassing. It would be kinder, perhaps, to draw a veil over the party's career from 1906 to the outbreak of the War. Most of us have something in our past career over which we choose to draw a veil. Note: A veil is a piece of cloth used by a woman to cover her face.
See also: draw, over, something, veil
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

draw a veil over

avoid discussing or calling attention to something, especially because it is embarrassing or unpleasant.
See also: draw, over, veil
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

cast/draw/throw a ˈveil over something

(written) say nothing or no more about something unpleasant: It is kinder to draw a veil over some of his later movies.
See also: cast, draw, over, something, throw, veil
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

draw a veil over, to

To conceal; to say no more about something. A cliché from the mid-nineteenth century, this analogy to hiding one’s face behind a veil is often used to gloss over the details of an embarrassing situation. Daniel Defoe, long known as a historian before he turned his hand to fiction, wrote in The True-born Englishman (1701), “Satyr, be kind! and draw a silent Veil! Thy native England’s vices to conceal.”
See also: draw, to, veil
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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