have (something) to offer

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have (something) to offer

To have a trait or skill that is appealing, desirable, or helpful to others. She has a lot of experience to offer, and I wouldn't discount that when you look at all the candidates for the job.
See also: have, offer
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

have something to ˈoffer

have something available that somebody wants: Barcelona has a lot to offer its visitors in the way of entertainment.He’s a young man with a great deal to offer (= who is intelligent, has many skills, etc.).
See also: have, offer, something
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017
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References in periodicals archive ?
The firm added that smaller publishers have seen sales fall, because they have been slow to adapt and make their titles available as e-books, as well as having to offer discounts to compete with larger online rivals.
Scottish Conservative deputy leader Jackson Carlaw added: "The SNP's ploy to get 16 and 17-yearolds on board has backfired so radically they are now having to offer iPads as Yes vote bribes.
Already you've got supermarkets admitting they're having to offer potatoes with blemishes."
If the country receives financial support it would be excluded from having to offer such guarantees.
Although his two runs prior to the Ulster National were pretty moderate, perhaps, in the unfortunate circumstances on the day, it would have been better to have spared trainer Brian Hamilton having to offer explanations, which were accepted, for Chief Oscar's improved form.
Lewis's performance in a tough Christmas for the high street, with most retailers having to offer heavy discounts to lure in shoppers leaving gift-buying until later.
On average buyers are still having to offer 1.5 per cent above the asking price in order to secure their home.
Under NCLB, if schools accept federal poverty aid end they don't meet the required goals for at least two straight years, they can face sanctions, such as having to offer transfers to a better performing school or risking state takeover.