have

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have (oneself) (something)

To enjoy or indulge in something. I'm going to sit down in the shade and have myself a cold glass of lemonade.
See also: have

have an edge on

To be drunk. Do you remember last night at the bar at all? You really had an edge on.
See also: edge, have, on

have an edge on (someone or something)

To have an advantage over someone or something; to be in a more favorable position than someone or something else. I think I have an edge on her in the race because I've been training so much harder.
See also: edge, have, on

have an/the edge over (someone or something)

To have an advantage over one. I've been preparing for this debate for weeks so that I have the edge over my opponent.
See also: edge, have, over

have the edge on (someone or something)

To have an advantage over someone or something. I've been preparing for this debate for weeks so that I have the edge on my opponent. Now that we have George, I think we definitely have the edge on the other team.
See also: edge, have, on
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

have

(someone) by the balls Vulgar Slang
To have control over someone; have someone at one's mercy.

have

/have got (someone's) back
To protect or shield someone from harm, loss, or danger.

have

/have got it all over
To be much better than (someone) at a particular endeavor.

have

/have got it in (one)
To have the capacity or disposition to (to do something).

have

/have got it in for
To act in a hostile manner toward or intend to harm (someone), especially because of a grudge.

have

/have got nothing on (someone)
1. To fail to be equal or superior to (someone) in a particular way.
2. To know or be able to prove information regarding (someone).

have

/keep (one's) nose to the grindstone
To work hard and steadily.

have

/keep (one's) fingers crossed
To hope for a successful or advantageous outcome.

have

/keep (one's) wits about (one)
To remain alert or calm, especially in a crisis.

have

/keep an ear to the ground
To be on the watch for new trends or information.

have

/speak with a forked tongue
To speak deceitfully; prevaricate or lie.

have

/take a whack at Informal
To try out; attempt.

have

/take pity on
To show compassion for.

have

/take the bit in one's teeth
To be uncontrollable; cast off restraint.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in classic literature ?
"Who, who?" cries Tom; but without waiting for an answer, having discovered the features of his Molly through all the discomposure in which they now were, he hastily alighted, turned his horse loose, and, leaping over the wall, ran to her.
Having scoured the whole coast of the enemy, as well as any of Homer's heroes ever did, or as Don Quixote or any knight-errant in the world could have done, he returned to Molly, whom he found in a condition which must give both me and my reader pain, was it to be described here.
Early in the spring, being utterly destitute, and in great extremity, and having worn out the hospitality of the Snakes, they determined to avail themselves of the buried treasures within their knowledge.
Several of the Snakes were slain on the spot; the residue, with their three Canadian allies, fled to the mountains, stripped of horses, buffalo meat, everything; and made their way back to the old encampment on Snake River, poorer than ever, but esteeming themselves fortunate in having escaped with their lives.
In addition to these points of distraction, Wardle was intrusted with two small letters to two small young ladies who were to act as bridesmaids; upon the receipt of which, the two young ladies were driven to despair by having no 'things' ready for so important an occasion, and no time to make them in--a circumstance which appeared to afford the two worthy papas of the two small young ladies rather a feeling of satisfaction than otherwise.
Tupman; with Sam Weller outside, having at his button-hole a white favour, the gift of his lady-love, and clad in a new and gorgeous suit of livery invented for the occasion.
He was now grown old, and had left off going to sea, having put his son, who was far from a young man, into his ship, and who still used the Brazil trade.
tobacco in roll, and sugar in chests, besides rum, molasses, &c., which is the consequence of a sugar-work; and I found by this account, that every year the income considerably increased; but, as above, the disbursements being large, the sum at first was small: however, the old man let me see that he was debtor to me four hundred and seventy moidores of gold, besides sixty chests of sugar and fifteen double rolls of tobacco, which were lost in his ship; he having been shipwrecked coming home to Lisbon, about eleven years after my having the place.
Keeping Miss Havisham in the background at a great distance, I still hinted at the possibility of my having competed with him in his prospects, and at the certainty of his possessing a generous soul, and being far above any mean distrusts, retaliations, or designs.
Of course I knew better than to offer to see Miss Skiffins home, and under the circumstances I thought I had best go first: which I did, taking a cordial leave of the Aged, and having passed a pleasant evening.
When the worthy citizen, the father of Cornelius, passed from time into eternity, three months after having buried his wife, who seemed to have departed first to smooth for him the path of death as she had smoothed for him the path of life, he said to his son, as he embraced him for the last time, --
The unexpected news of the French having crossed the Niemen was particularly startling after a month of unfulfilled expectations, and at a ball.
Thus, as I believe, the most wonderful of all known instincts, that of the hive-bee, can be explained by natural selection having taken advantage of numerous, successive, slight modifications of simpler instincts; natural selection having by slow degrees, more and more perfectly, led the bees to sweep equal spheres at a given distance from each other in a double layer, and to build up and excavate the wax along the planes of intersection.
I will speak of Louis[*] (and not of Charles[+]) as the one whose conduct is the better to be observed, he having held possession of Italy for the longest period; and you will see that he has done the opposite to those things which ought to be done to retain a state composed of divers elements.
This step having been taken, my connection with the matter came to an end.