have

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Related to haves: halves
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have (oneself) (something)

To enjoy or indulge in something. I'm going to sit down in the shade and have myself a cold glass of lemonade.
See also: have

have an edge on

To be drunk. Do you remember last night at the bar at all? You really had an edge on.
See also: edge, have, on

have an edge on (someone or something)

To have an advantage over someone or something; to be in a more favorable position than someone or something else. I think I have an edge on her in the race because I've been training so much harder.
See also: edge, have, on

have an/the edge over (someone or something)

To have an advantage over one. I've been preparing for this debate for weeks so that I have the edge on my opponent.
See also: edge, have, over

have the edge on (someone or something)

To have an advantage over one. I've been preparing for this debate for weeks so that I have the edge on my opponent. Now that we have George, I think we definitely have the edge on the other team.
See also: edge, have, on

have

(someone) by the balls Vulgar Slang
To have control over someone; have someone at one's mercy.

have

/have got (someone's) back
To protect or shield someone from harm, loss, or danger.

have

/have got it all over
To be much better than (someone) at a particular endeavor.

have

/have got it in (one)
To have the capacity or disposition to (to do something).

have

/have got it in for
To act in a hostile manner toward or intend to harm (someone), especially because of a grudge.

have

/have got nothing on (someone)
1. To fail to be equal or superior to (someone) in a particular way.
2. To know or be able to prove information regarding (someone).

have

/keep (one's) nose to the grindstone
To work hard and steadily.

have

/keep (one's) fingers crossed
To hope for a successful or advantageous outcome.

have

/keep (one's) wits about (one)
To remain alert or calm, especially in a crisis.

have

/keep an ear to the ground
To be on the watch for new trends or information.

have

/speak with a forked tongue
To speak deceitfully; prevaricate or lie.

have

/take a whack at Informal
To try out; attempt.

have

/take pity on
To show compassion for.

have

/take the bit in one's teeth
To be uncontrollable; cast off restraint.
See:
References in classic literature ?
Goody Brown had great advantage of Molly in this particular; for the former had indeed no breasts, her bosom (if it may be so called), as well in colour as in many other properties, exactly resembling an antient piece of parchment, upon which any one might have drummed a considerable while without doing her any great damage.
Molly, beside her present unhappy condition, was differently formed in those parts, and might, perhaps, have tempted the envy of Brown to give her a fatal blow, had not the lucky arrival of Tom Jones at this instant put an immediate end to the bloody scene.
This accident was luckily owing to Mr Square; for he, Master Blifil, and Jones, had mounted their horses, after church, to take the air, and had ridden about a quarter of a mile, when Square, changing his mind (not idly, but for a reason which we shall unfold as soon as we have leisure), desired the young gentlemen to ride with him another way than they had at first purposed.
Pickwick in a low voice, 'I shall never regret having devoted the greater part of two years to mixing with different varieties and shades of human character, frivolous as my pursuit of novelty may have appeared to many.
His account of both was quite satisfactory to Wardle --as almost any other account would have been, for the good old gentleman was overflowing with Hilarity and kindness--and a handsome portion having been bestowed upon Emily, the marriage was fixed to take place on the fourth day from that time --the suddenness of which preparations reduced three dressmakers and a tailor to the extreme verge of insanity.
Everything the good man said was full of affection, and I could hardly refrain from tears while he spoke; in short, I took one hundred of the moidores, and called for a pen and ink to give him a receipt for them: then I returned him the rest, and told him if ever I had possession of the plantation I would return the other to him also (as, indeed, I afterwards did); and that as to the bill of sale of his part in his son's ship, I would not take it by any means; but that if I wanted the money, I found he was honest enough to pay me; and if I did not, but came to receive what he gave me reason to expect, I would never have a penny more from him.
In a word, I turned pale, and grew sick; and, had not the old man run and fetched me a cordial, I believe the sudden surprise of joy had overset nature, and I had died upon the spot: nay, after that I continued very ill, and was so some hours, till a physician being sent for, and something of the real cause of my illness being known, he ordered me to be let blood; after which I had relief, and grew well: but I verify believe, if I had not been eased by a vent given in that manner to the spirits, I should have died.
And to this hour I have not the faintest notion what he meant, or what joke he thought I had made.
I was modestly wondering whether my utmost ingenuity would have enabled me to say anything that would have amused him half as much as this imaginary pleasantry, when I was startled by a sudden click in the wall on one side of the chimney, and the ghostly tumbling open of a little wooden flap with "JOHN" upon it.
Your time to die will also come; and if you are not then so fortunate as to have a son, you will let my name grow extinct, and my guilders, which no one has ever fingered but my father, myself, and the coiner, will have the surprise of passing to an unknown master.
His exertions, indeed, were crowned with a most magnificent result: he produced three new tulips, which he called the "Jane," after his mother; the "Van Baerle," after his father; and the "Cornelius," after his godfather; the other names have escaped us, but the fanciers will be sure to find them in the catalogues of the times.
Reflecting on this case, it occurred to me that if the Melipona had made its spheres at some given distance from each other, and had made them of equal sizes and had arranged them symmetrically in a double layer, the resulting structure would probably have been as perfect as the comb of the hive-bee.
41421 (or at some lesser distance), from the centres of the six surrounding spheres in the same layer; and at the same distance from the centres of the adjoining spheres in the other and parallel layer; then, if planes of intersection between the several spheres in both layers be formed, there will result a double layer of hexagonal prisms united together by pyramidal bases formed of three rhombs; and the rhombs and the sides of the hexagonal prisms will have every angle identically the same with the best measurements which have been made of the cells of the hive-bee.
The general reasons for the first have been discussed; it remains to name those for the second, and to see what resources he had, and what any one in his situation would have had for maintaining himself more securely in his acquisition than did the King of France.
When they are, it is easier to hold them, especially when they have not been accustomed to self- government; and to hold them securely it is enough to have destroyed the family of the prince who was ruling them; because the two peoples, preserving in other things the old conditions, and not being unlike in customs, will live quietly together, as one has seen in Brittany, Burgundy, Gascony, and Normandy, which have been bound to France for so long a time: and, although there may be some difference in language, nevertheless the customs are alike, and the people will easily be able to get on amongst themselves.