have eyes in the back of head


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have eyes in the back of (one's) head

To be or seem to be able to detect what is going on all around one, even beyond one's field of vision. My mom always seems to know when we've done something we shouldn't have. She has eyes in the back of her head! Look, just be very careful not to do personal things during the work day—the boss has eyes in the back of his head.
See also: back, eye, have, head, of

have eyes in the back of one's head

Fig. to seem to be able to sense what is going on behind or outside of one's field of vision. My teacher seems to have eyes in the back of her head. My teacher doesn't need to have eyes in the back of his head. He watches us very carefully.
See also: back, eye, have, head, of

eyes in the back of one's head, to have

To be exceptionally alert. This expression dates from Roman times, appearing in Plautus’s play Aulularia (ca. 210 b.c.) and cited by Erasmus in his collection of adages. Put slightly differently, it appeared in John Still’s play Gammer Gurton’s Needle (ca. 1565): “Take heed of Sim Glovers wife, she hath an eie behind her!” (2.2).
See also: back, eye, have, of