hatred


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eaten up with (something)

Obsessed, overcome, or preoccupied with some negative emotion. I've been eaten up with anger ever since I found out that my co-worker totally sabotaged me for that promotion. I'm really worried about Wendy—she's still eaten up with guilt over what happened.
See also: eaten, up

hatred is as blind as love

If you hate someone, you are incapable of seeing them as they really are. I can't believe I initially disliked Paul—he's such a fun guy! I guess hatred is as blind as love. People on both sides of the political divide seem incapable of regarding each other as compatriots. Instead, hatred is as blind as love, and they only see one another as enemies less than human.
See also: blind, hatred, love
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Types of psychic power and their potential use for hatred include the following abilities: to see into the future; to move objects; to influence animals to attack people or cause them to have an accident; to divine information about the past, as well as determine information from holding an object as a proxy substitute form of engagement with objects of psychic resonance; to conjure up superhuman spirits or forces; to know what is going on somewhere other than where one presently is without use of any technology; to make things invisible; to appear to be somewhere else or in two places simultaneously; and, to influence people's minds to act against their will or cause hallucinations (pp.
Heather, 43, said: "Hatred is a huge and often underestimated issue in contemporary society.
She said: "Hatred is a huge and often under-estimated issue in contemporary society.
This hatred is not a dislike borne of ignorance but an unreasoned, irrational hatred leading to psychopathic type actions.
Those who follow Islam across the globe are often grouped together as terrorists or extremists, but many Muslims are trying to educate us about their peaceful teachings and their hatred of violence.
He said: "It is a measure of how far we have come in the last 10 years that we are now appalled by hatred directed at people on the basis of sexuality.
The move to outlaw inciting homophobic hatred comes after ministers moved to criminalise such activity on religious grounds earlier this year, and could set off a similar row over free speech.
Anyone convicted of the offence, which follows the introduction of the Racial and Religious Hatred Act, faces up to seven years in jail.
bishops urged Americans "to turn away from the bitter fruits of the kind of hatred which is the source of this tragedy." Pope John Paul II's prayer for survivors the following day was "that the spiral of hatred and violence will not prevail." Similarly, on the one-month anniversary, the pope prayed that Americans would "resist the temptation to hatred and violence." And as recently as October 16, 2006, the apostolic nuncio to the United Nations warned that if counter-terrorism should violate fundamental human rights, "it would corrode the very values that it intends to protect."
Buddha said: "Hatred is not ended by hatred, it is ended by love' this is an ancient law." This looks reasonable, but it seems to be frequently ignored in international politics.
But most of us are delighted for an excuse to let ourselves go, relieved to find a cause for our causeless hatred. Even hatred with a legitimate cause attaches itself with dismaying ease to self-justifying and inexhaustible rage.
Thorns Of An Innocent Soul is a short novella about two women, corrupted by hatred and enmity in life, forced to confront their own flaws and failings after death.
British Prime Minister Tony Blair on Wednesday attempted to play down his humiliation at the government's defeat in parliament the previous day over his religious hatred bill, which was defeated by just one vote after he himself had failed to stay for the decisive ballot.