have a good mind to (do something)

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have a good mind to (do something)

To feel a strong urge or desire to do something. I have a good mind to tell those kids to get off my lawn! She was so upset that she had a good mind to write a letter of complaint to the president of the company.
See also: good, have, mind
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

have a good mind to

Be strongly inclined to, as in She had a good mind to tell him everything. A slightly weaker form of this idiom is have a mind to, as in I have a mind to spend my next vacation in the desert. Formerly this idiom was sometimes put as have a great mind to. [c. 1400] Also see half a mind.
See also: good, have, mind
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

have a good mind to do something

COMMON If you say that you have a good mind to do something, you are threatening to do it, although you probably will not do it. He raged on about how he had a good mind to resign. I have a good mind to turn right around and head straight home.
See also: good, have, mind, something
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

have a good mind to ˈdo something

,

have half a mind to ˈdo something


1 used to say that you think you will do something, although you are not sure: I’ve got half a mind to sell my car and buy a new one.I’ve a good mind to give up this stupid job.
2 used to say that you disapprove of what somebody has done and should do something about it, although you probably will not: I’ve got a good mind to write and tell your parents about it.
See also: good, have, mind, something
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

have a good/half a mind to, to

To be strongly inclined toward; to be somewhat inclined toward. The first term began life back in the fifteenth century as having a great mind to do something, as in “I have a great mynd to be a lecherous man” (John Bale, Kyng Johan, ca. 1550). In 1674 Lord Clarendon wrote in History of the Rebellion, “The duke of Lorrayne had a very good mind to get a footing in Ireland.” The second phrase, which implies indecision—half of one’s mind inclines one way and the other half the other way—was known by 1700 or so and appeared more and more often in the nineteenth century. “She had half a mind to reply,” wrote Edward Bulwer-Lytton (My Novel, 1853).
See also: good, half, have, mind
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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