harry


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Related to harry: Harry Houdini

play Old Harry with (something)

To ruin or cause serious damage to something; to greatly upset, disrupt, or negatively affect something; to play the devil with something ("Old Harry" being a nickname for the devil). Lack of oversight allowed overzealous investment bankers to play Old Harry with the economy. I love wine, but it plays Old Harry with my stomach!
See also: harry, old, play

any Tom, Dick, or Harry

Any common, undistinguished person; anyone at all, indiscriminately. You don't want any Tom, Dick, or Harry coming to your performance, but then you don't want to limit the amount of business you might bring in, either. Kate's being very selective as to who gets invited to the wedding, as she doesn't want just any Tom, Dick, or Harry turning up.
See also: any, harry

Tom, Dick, or Harry

A common, undistinguished person; any manner of person, indiscriminately. (Usually in the form "(just) any Tom, Dick, or Harry.") You don't want just any Tom, Dick, or Harry coming to your performance, but then you don't want to limit the amount of business you might bring in, either. Kate's being very selective as to who gets invited to the wedding, as she doesn't want Tom, Dick, or Harry turning up.
See also: harry

every Tom, Dick, and Harry

Every kind of common, undistinguished person; anyone at all, indiscriminately. You don't want every Tom, Dick, and Harry coming to your performance, but then you don't want to limit the amount of business you might bring in, either. Kate's being very selective as to who gets invited to the wedding, as she doesn't want every Tom, Dick, and Harry turning up.
See also: and, every, harry

Tom, Dick, and Harry

Common, undistinguished people; any manner of person, indiscriminately. (Usually in the form "every Tom, Dick, and Harry.") You don't want Tom, Dick, and Harry coming to your performance, but then you don't want to limit the amount of business you might bring in, either. Kate's being very selective as to who gets invited to the wedding, as she doesn't want Tom, Dick, and Harry to end up coming.
See also: and, harry

(every) Tom, Dick, and Harry

 and any Tom, Dick, and Harry
Fig. everyone, without discrimination; ordinary people. (Not necessarily males.) The golf club is very exclusive. They don't let any Tom, Dick, or Harry join. Mary's sending out very few invitations. She doesn't want every Tom, Dick, and Harry turning up.
See also: and, harry

every Tom, Dick, and Harry

Also, every mother's son; every man Jack. Everyone, all ordinary individuals, as in This model should appeal to every Tom, Dick, and Harry. The use of masculine names in this way dates from Shakespeare's time (he used Tom, Dick, and Francis in 1 Henry IV), but the current one dates from the early 1800s. The two variants are largely British usage but occasionally are used in America. The first is recorded as early as 1583, whereas the second dates from the first half of the 1800s.
See also: and, every, harry

every Tom, Dick, and Harry

or

every Tom, Dick, or Harry

People say every Tom, Dick, and Harry or every Tom, Dick, or Harry to talk about many different people, especially people they do not think are special or important. These days, the hotel is letting in every Tom, Dick and Harry. Note: This expression is very variable, for example, any can be used instead of every, and Harriet and other names are sometimes used instead of Harry. You cannot sell a gun to any Tom Dick or Harry, can you? Any Tom, Dick or Harriet can put on a jacket and say, `I'll be a producer.' Note: All of these names used to be very common, and so they began to be used to refer to ordinary people in general.
See also: and, every, harry

Tom, Dick, and Harry

used to refer to ordinary people in general.
This expression is first recorded in an 18th-century song: ‘Farewell, Tom, Dick, and Harry. Farewell, Moll, Nell, and Sue’. It is generally used in mildly derogatory contexts (he didn't want every Tom, Dick, and Harry knowing their business ) to suggest a large number of ordinary or undistinguished people.
See also: and, harry

every/any ˌTom, ˌDick and/or ˈHarry

(usually disapproving) any ordinary person; people of no special value to you: We don’t want just any Tom, Dick or Harry marrying our daughter.
See also: and, any, dick, every, harry
References in periodicals archive ?
BROLLY: Harry Worth | |in Scarborough, 1965 The comedian - who was also a self-taught ventriloquist - worked in variety and toured with Laurel and Hardy towards the end of their showbusiness careers.
Harry's mum Georgina, head of Yardley based charity Help Harry Help Others, announced the addition of Bannatyne on Twitter.
Police and prosecutors believe Harry, whose body was found on Saturday, March 24, jumped to his death from an 11th floor window after the alleged fight with a fellow Jumeirah College pupil at a party.
And when Harry met Harry this week, the star admitted the likeness was uncanny.
Robert Moats Miller, Harry Emerson Fosdick: Preacher, Pastor, Prophet (New York: Oxford University Press, 1985), 335.
In England Harry was thrown into the upper class world of Cambridge society staying in the family home of Lady Edith MacAlister, widow of a former Chancellor of Glasgow University and her sister Anne a fellow Quaker--both of whom were young Harry's sponsors.
But the stress is on Harry, Hermione and Ron and their move into that unsettling, awkward world of adolescence.
I THINK in the second book of Harry Potter, when he had the detention for being up so late, Lord Voldermort was drinking the unicorn's blood.
There was no high school in Searchlight, so Harry had to hitchhike to Basic High in nearby Henderson.
As he sat down at the table, Harry looked down at his plate.
The object of this discussion is to reflect on the possible reasons for the remarkable popularity of Harry Potter.
When we first met the young wizard-in-training Harry Potter some six years ago, he had spent a decade in the care of his overbearing "muggle" (non-magical) aunt and uncle after surviving the murder of his parents by the evil Voldemort.
When the youngest of the three men we've seen by the river is murdered by local bad guys--thus setting in motion a cycle of revenge that inevitably leads to a bloody denouement--his traveling companions, Harry (Fonda) and Arch (Warren Oates), give him a hasty burial.