harm

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it wouldn't do (someone) any harm (to do something)

It would or may be good, pragmatic, or beneficial for someone (to do something). You know, it wouldn't do you any harm to comb your hair from time to time. I know that the managers are trying to cut costs, but it wouldn't do them any harm to treat us to a staff lunch every once in a while. Jonathan should try and spend more time with his mother. It wouldn't do him any harm, after all.
See also: any, harm

there is no harm in (someone's) doing (something)

Doing something may be good, pragmatic, or beneficial, and will not cause any problems or harm. The contractor might not be willing to go any lower on the price, but there's no harm in asking. Sure, you might not be accepted for the PhD program, but there's no harm in your trying, is there?
See also: harm, no, there

it does no harm (for someone) to do (something)

Doing something may be good, pragmatic, or beneficial, and will not cause any problems or harm. The contractor might not be willing to go any lower on the price, but it does no harm to ask. Sure, you might not be accepted for the PhD program, but it does no harm for you to try, does it?
See also: does, harm, no

come to harm

To encounter an unpleasant situation, often one involving injury or damage. If anyone comes to harm in this operation, you will have to answer to the chief. My car came to harm during the storm when a tree branch fell on it.
See also: come, harm

do more harm than good

To exacerbate the problem, rather than making it better, often in the process of trying to help. I'm worried that I did more harm than good by applying that tourniquet by myself. I should have just waited for the paramedics to get here. Doug means well, but he usually does more harm than good when he tries to help with the sorting.
See also: good, harm, more

harm a hair on (one's) head

To hurt or injure one in any way. This phrase is often used in the negative. If I find that he harmed a hair on your head, I'll go to his house right now! He wouldn't dare harm a hair on your head—not when I'm around.
See also: hair, harm, head, on

no harm, no foul

If there was no bad outcome to an action, then there's no need to be angry or upset about it. A: "Oh, excuse me! I'm so sorry for knocking over your glass!" B: "It's OK, it was empty. No harm, no foul!"
See also: foul, no

wouldn't harm a fly

Is particularly shy, diffident, or timid by nature. My brother is a very sweet, warm-hearted man who wouldn't harm a fly. How can you suspect him of committing this crime?
See also: fly, harm

mean (one) no harm

To have no intention of causing harm, offense, or negative effects (to one). I'm so sorry that my comments got you fired—I swear, I meant no harm! Please, put down the gun, I mean you no harm.
See also: harm, mean, no

not mean (one) any harm

To have no intention of causing harm, offense, or negative effects (to one). I'm so sorry that my comments got you fired—I swear, I didn't mean any harm! Please, put down the gun, I don't mean you any harm.
See also: any, harm, mean, not

come to no harm

To not receive or undergo injury, damage, or mistreatment. If you follow the instructions and pay us the money, I guarantee that your son will come to no harm. We must ensure that civilians come to no harm during the operation.
See also: come, harm, no

not come to harm

To not receive or undergo injury, damage, or mistreatment. If you follow the instructions and pay us the money, I guarantee that your son will not come to harm. We must ensure that civilians don't come to harm during the operation.
See also: come, harm, not

not harm a hair on (one's) head

To not hurt or injure someone in even the slightest degree. They had better not harm a hair on your head, or I'll go to the police!
See also: hair, harm, head, not, on

not touch a hair on (one's) head

To not hurt or injure someone in even the slightest degree. They had better not touch a hair on your head, or I'll go to the police!
See also: hair, head, not, on, touch

no harm done

There was no real damage or seriously bad outcome (as a result of something), so there is no need to worry or get angry about it. Hey, stop shouting! Your brother didn't break the toy, this piece just popped off, see? There, I fixed it, no harm done. A: "Oh my gosh, I'm so sorry, I didn't see you standing there!" B: "It's OK, you barely grazed me. No harm done!"
See also: done, harm, no

out of harm's way

Not or no longer in a place, condition, or situation that might result in one's harm or peril. We need to get all these bystanders out of harm's way before we try and put the fire out. You're so anxious to keep your children out of harm's way that you're going to end up denying them a lot of valuable life experiences.
See also: of, out, way

come to harm

to experience something bad; to get damaged or harmed. I sincerely hope that you do not come to harm. I hope no one comes to harm.
See also: come, harm

*in harm's way

Fig. liable to be harmed; subject to potential causes of harm. (*Typically: be ~; get ~; put someone ~.) Soldiers are expected to know what to do when they are in harm's way.
See also: way

No harm done.

It is all right. No one or nothing has been harmed. It's okay. No harm done. A: I am sorry I stepped on your toe. B: No harm done.
See also: done, harm, no

*out of harm's way

Fig. not liable to be harmed; away from any causes of harm. (*Typically: be ~; get ~; get someone ~.) We should try to get all the civilians out of harm's way.
See also: of, out, way

do someone wrong

Also, do someone damage or harm . Injure someone; be unfaithful or disloyal; act unjustly or unfairly toward someone. For example, John's done me wrong, and I intend to tell him so, or She did him real damage when she started that rumor: The first term dates from the late 1300s; the substitutions of damage and harm are newer. However, while these locutions are still current, a more common modern usage is to turn them into verbal phrases-that is, wrong someone, harm someone, damage someone.
See also: someone, wrong

out of harm's way

In a safe condition or place, as in We fenced the yard to keep the children out of harm's way. This idiom was first recorded about 1661.
See also: of, out, way

wouldn't hurt a fly

or

wouldn't harm a fly

If someone wouldn't hurt a fly or wouldn't harm a fly, they are very kind and gentle. She was such a lovely girl, who wouldn't have hurt a fly. He is, he insists, a pacifist, who would not harm a fly.
See also: fly, hurt

out of harm's way

COMMON If someone or something is out of harm's way, they are in a safe place away from danger or from the possibility of being damaged. For parents, this is an easy way of keeping their children entertained, or simply out of harm's way. Workers scrambled to carry priceless objects out of harm's way.
See also: of, out, way

there's no harm in doing something

COMMON People say there's no harm in doing something to mean that it will not cause problems and may have a good result. They are not always willing to take on untrained workers, but there's no harm in asking. As I see it, there is no harm in cooperating with the police.
See also: harm, no, something

wouldn't hurt (or harm) a fly

used to emphasize how inoffensive and harmless a person or animal is.
See also: fly, hurt

not harm a hair of someone's head

not cause someone the slightest harm.
See also: hair, harm, head, not, of

out of harm's way

in a safe place.
1996 Frank McCourt Angela's Ashes Take down the Pope and hide him in the coal hole…where he won't be seen and he'll be out of harm's way.
See also: of, out, way

there is no harm in —

the course of action specified may not guarantee success but is at least unlikely to have unwelcome repercussions.
1997 Arundhati Roy The God of Small Things He decided that since she couldn't have a husband there was no harm in her having an education.
See also: harm, no, there

he, she, etc. wouldn’t harm/hurt a ˈfly

he, she, etc. is kind and gentle, and would not hurt anyone: The dog may look very fierce, but he wouldn’t hurt a fly.
See also: fly, harm, hurt

not harm/touch a hair of somebody’s ˈhead

not hurt somebody physically in any way at all: If he harms a hair of my daughter’s head, I’ll kill him.
See also: hair, harm, head, not, of, touch

ˌno ˈharm done

(spoken) used to tell somebody not to worry because they have caused no serious damage or injury: Forget it, Dave, no harm done.
See also: done, harm, no

not come to (any) ˈharm

,

come to no ˈharm

not be injured, badly treated or damaged, etc: The child will come to no harm if she stays there.
See also: come, harm, not

out of harm’s ˈway

in a place where somebody/something cannot cause or suffer injury, accident, loss, etc: Most people think that dangerous criminals should be locked up out of harm’s way.You should put these glasses out of harm’s way. They’re too valuable to use every day.
See also: of, out, way

there’s no harm in (somebody’s) doing something

,

it does no harm (for somebody) to do something

used to tell somebody that something is a good idea and will not cause any problems: He may say no, but there’s no harm in asking.It does no harm to ask.
See also: harm, no, something

mean (somebody) no ˈharm

,

not mean (somebody) any ˈharm

not have any intention of hurting somebody: Try not to worry about what he said. I know you thought he was rude, but he didn’t mean any harm by it.
See also: harm, mean, no

out of harm's way

In a safe place, away from possible accident or injury. This term dates from the mid-1600s. Richard Steele had it in The Spectator (1711) in what might well be hyperbolic form: “People send Children to school to keep them out of harm’s way.” Oddly enough the corollary, “in harm’s way,” never caught on.
See also: of, out, way
References in periodicals archive ?
are wrongfully harmed. The legislature could use civil measures to
The emotional response, the objector might add, has two parts: feeling harmed, and becoming angry as a result; and anticipating the satisfaction of getting even.
It seems plausible to suppose that flying under these conditions has harmed you, as compared with similarly situated passengers on a flight without engine failure.
On the Harm View the strength of a right is subjective in the following way: just how strong a right of mine is depends on how much I'd be harmed by its infringement.
However, since that event did not occur, the plans were not harmed. Moreover, since Ahlberg was the sole beneficiary of the plan, any harm the plan might have suffered would have harmed only him.
The account of harm that she explicitly endorses is Feinberg's normative sense of harm, on which "[t]o say that A harmed B ...
(16) But in political debate, interest groups have learned to claim that they are harmed by any conduct they wish to regulate.
May explains the idea of harm to humanity as follows: "To determine if harm to humanity has occurred, there will have to be one of two (and ideally both) of the following conditions met: either the individual is harmed because of that person's group membership or other non-individualized characteristic, or the harm occurs due to the involvement of a group such as the State" (p.
She said the issue surrounded "a very distinct group" who harmed themselves as a way of coping rather than for attention.
When you look at the malpractice suits that are filed, even though only 2 percent of negligence leads to suits, people who have been victims of negligence are the ones most likely to sue, and people who have suffered non-negligent "adverse events"--in short, those who have been harmed by their care--are next most likely to sue.
She took her first report to Senator Patrick Leahy who sponsored legislation to provide $18 million in aid to innocent Iraqis who were harmed in the military operations.
And 50% of young people who commit suicide were found to have deliberately harmed themselves in the previous year.
If the party that allegedly caused the harm does not respond within 30 days, the party that was harmed may immediately file suit.
It responds to a common feeling: one who wrongfully inflicted harm should not benefit and should compensate the person he harmed. The actual feeling is something like this: Why should he, who deprived me of one eye, continue to enjoy two eyes?