hark

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Related to harking: harking back

hark(en) back to (something)

1. To cause one to think of something. That song harkens back to an earlier time in my life.
2. To have originated or begun as something. You know, our modern cell phones hark back to those old rotary phones you like to make fun of.
3. To revisit something mentioned earlier. Before we get too upset, let's all harken back to the real reason we're here today.
See also: back

hark who's talking

One is guilty of the same thing they have just criticized. A: "Kathy never pays attention in class." B: "Hark who's talking! Just today I saw you reading a magazine during the lecture."
See also: hark, talk

hark(en) back to something

 
1. to have originated as something; to have started out as something. (Harken is an older word meaning "pay heed to.") The word icebox harks back to refrigerators that were cooled by ice. Our modern breakfast cereals hark back to the porridge and gruel of our ancestors.
2. to remind one of something. Seeing a horse and buggy in the park harks back to the time when horses drew milk wagons. Sally says it harkens back to the time when everything was delivered by horse-drawn wagons.
See also: back, hark

hark back

Return to a previous point, as in Let us hark back briefly to my first statement. This expression originally alluded to hounds retracing their course when they have lost their quarry's scent. It may be dying out. [First half of 1800s]
See also: back, hark

hark who's talking

or

look who's talking

People say Hark who's talking! or Look who's talking! to mean that something critical that someone has just said about someone else is true of them too. Hark who's talking! If you were so honest, we wouldn't be in this mess. `They're all mad.' `Look who's talking, you crazy old bat!'
See also: hark, talk
References in periodicals archive ?
The former hung low, literally at one's side, with the barest horizon line and an allover riot of "scribblings," precision-cut from black felt, suggesting a landscape (a forest or swamp) or, harking back to Abstract Expressionism, orchestrated chaos.
Yet the theme, harking back to Bourgeois's 1947 suite of engravings with text "He Disappeared into Complete Silence," weds architectural forms to the cycle of nurture, rejection, and reconciliation experienced between mother and child.
in that monastery, Chow communes with the souls of the celluloid dead - Melville's Le Samourai and Peckinpah's The Killer Elite - while both harking back to Scorsese's gangster-Catholicism and anticipating Buddhist rites to come: Chow's saintly assassin is truly a monk with guns.