hard-boiled

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hard-boiled

1. Literally, having reached a solid state through boiling, as of eggs. Mom is making hard-boiled eggs for breakfast.
2. Tough and dispassionate; hardened by experience. My brother, the hard-boiled police officer, becomes a gushing fool if you ask him about his baby daughter.

hardboiled

mod. tough; heartless. Do you have to act so hardboiled?
References in periodicals archive ?
In other words, was the tradition of hard-boiled crime writing (most lucidly interpreted by Chandler in his novels and the essay "The Simple Art of Murder") about to take the big sleep?' Fans of this subgenre of mysteries and writers had been shocked throughout the 1980s by the cancellation of contracts for books in the hardboiled vein.
The genre was popularized by Hammett, Dashiell, whose first truly hard-boiled story, "Fly Paper," appeared in the pulp magazine Black Mask in 1929.
At this point, the difference between hard-boiled and raw eggs becomes important.
However, as all doting mothers do, she insisted on cooking, and before we knew it, she was in the kitchen, cooking her Good Friday specialties-her bacalao, which was my dads favorite, and the hard-boiled eggs in tomato sauce.
Method: Put chopped Spam and hard-boiled eggs into a mixing bowl and combine.
While in Guisborough rugby players and coaches competed to see who could eat the most hard-boiled eggs in ten minutes.
For example, you can batch cook hard-boiled eggs or chop raw vegetables early in the week; they'll last about a week in your refrigerator.
According to (https://www.marthastewart.com/354061/perfect-hard-boiled-eggs) Martha Stewart , the best recipe for hard-boiled eggs is a classic one.
Then my mother went on a diet based on hard-boiled eggs and apples.
Her daughter prefers the hard-boiled eggs served with adobo.
Agnew, a biomedical electronics consultant who has written several books on the Old West, traces the history of pulp literature from 1830 to 1960, focusing on dime novels, pulp magazines, and other sensationalist literature from their start in the 19th century to the transition into paperback novels in the 1950s, with emphasis on the cowboy hero and the hard-boiled detective.
Easter eggs are symbolic of the resurrection of Christ and are particularly relevant to Orthodox and Eastern Catholic churches who paint hard-boiled eggs red to symbolise the blood of Christ.
Whether consumed post-workout and/or in between meals, hard-boiled eggs are an excellent protein-rich snack.
These days, it being winter, you find many pushcart vendors selling warm hard-boiled eggs, which are as much in demand as chicken broth or chicken corn soup.