hang in there

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hang in there

An expression of encouragement to persist or stay calm in a challenging situation. I know you're worried, but hang in there—the doctor will call soon.
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Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

Hang in there.

Be patient, things will work out. Bob: Everything is in such a mess. I can't seem to get things done right. Jane: Hang in there, Bob. Things will work out. Mary: Sometimes I just don't think I can go on. Sue: Hang in there, Mary. Things will work out.
See also: hang, there
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

hang in there

or

hang on in there

INFORMAL
COMMON If you tell someone to hang in there or to hang on in there, you encourage them to continue with something even if it is difficult. Hang in there and you never know what you might achieve. My message to all those people stuck in a property they're dying to sell is hang on in there. Things will improve.
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Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

hang in there

remain persistent and determined in difficult circumstances. informal, especially North American
See also: hang, there
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

hang (on) ˈin there

(informal) used for encouraging somebody to continue trying to achieve something: ‘I’ll never find a job.’ ‘Look, just hang on in there. I’m sure you’ll get something soon.’
See also: hang, there
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

hang in there

in. to keep trying; to persevere. I’ll just hang in there. Maybe things will get better.
See also: hang, there
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

hang in there

Keep at it, persevere. An American slang expression dating from the first half of the 1900s, this imperative is believed to have originated in sports, where it is often shouted as an encouragement to a competitor or team. However, it also is used as a simple verb meaning the same thing, as in, “He has managed to hang in even though he does not have tenure.”
See also: hang, there
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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