hands down


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hand down

1. To hand something to someone who is physically below oneself. A noun or pronoun can be used between "hand" and "down." While you're on the stepstool, can you hand down the cake mix from the top shelf?
2. To announce a decision. A noun or pronoun can be used between "hand" and "down." When do you think the boss will hand down a decision on this issue?
3. To yield or give something to a younger person, often a relative. A noun or pronoun can be used between "hand" and "down." I always have to wear the clothes that my older sisters hand down to me.
See also: down, hand

hands down

Easily, decisively, or without question. The term originates from horse racing, in which jockeys assured of a victory may lower their hold on the reins in the final stretch. This is the best pie I've ever had, hands down! We were really unprepared for our last game, and the other team won hands down.
See also: down, hand

hands down

easily; unquestionably. She won the contest hands down. They declared her the winner hands down.
See also: down, hand

hands down

1. Also, in a breeze; in a walk. Easily, without effort, as in She won the election hands down, or They won in a breeze, 10-0, or The top players get through the first rounds of the tournament in a walk. All of these expressions originated in sports. Hands down, dating from the mid-1800s, comes from horse racing, where jockeys drop their hands downward and relax their hold when they are sure to win. In a breeze, first recorded in a baseball magazine in 1910, alludes to the rapid and easy passage of moving air; in a walk, also from baseball, alludes to taking a base on balls, that is, reaching first base without having hit a pitched ball because of the pitcher's mistakes.
2. Unquestionably, without a doubt, as in Hands down, it was the best thing I've ever done.
See also: down, hand

hands down

(especially of winning) easily and decisively.
Originally a horse-racing expression, win hands down meant that a jockey was so certain of victory in the closing stages of a race that he could lower his hands, thereby relaxing his hold on the reins and ceasing to urge on his horse.
See also: down, hand

hands down

mod. easily; unquestionably. She won the contest hands down.
See also: down, hand

hands down

1. With no trouble; easily.
2. Indisputably; unquestionably.
See also: down, hand

hands down

Easily, without effort. The term comes from racing, where a jockey may drop his hands and relax his hold on the reins when he is sure to win the race. Dating from the mid-nineteenth century, the term still is used with regard to various kinds of competition, as in, “She won the nomination hands down.”
See also: down, hand
References in periodicals archive ?
Brian, who now works as a tiler in a bathroom unit factory in Cramlington, said: "The NUM has won this case hands down on two occasions and, to be honourable to the workforce which was so loyal to them, UK Coal should agree to make these payments."
Cheney intimates say, hands down, that individual is economist Arthur Laffer who no doubt will be asked his opinion on personnel matters.
Patti Dill, an Army captain when he met Roberts (he's since left the military) showed his face to the camera and admitted that, in the era of "don't ask, don't tell," appearing in front of the Real World cameras was "hands down ...
-- A former professor at Cambria County Area Community College was ordered to stand trial on charges that he placed his hands down a 19-year-old female student's pants in the classroom.
AN optician groped a lesbian's breasts and put her hands down his underpants during an eye test, it was claimed yesterday.
One student asked him how much of a role a Justice's political affiliation has on the decisions the Court hands down.