hammer away at (something)

(redirected from hammers away at)

hammer away at (something)

1. To strike something repeatedly The mechanic hammered away at the dent in my door. I hammered away at the beef with a meat tenderizer.
2. To work hard on something persistently over time. Yes, we're still hammering away at the details of this contract.
3. To talk about something at length, often to the listener's annoyance. Quit hammering away at that topic—no one wants to hear about it anymore.
See also: away, hammer
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

hammer away at

Keep at something continuously, as in The reporters hammered away at the candidate. This phrase employs hammer in the sense of "beat repeatedly," a usage dating from the mid-1600s.
See also: away, hammer
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
The chisel-head action of the Grundomat tool is unique because it hammers away at solid obstacles.
The chisel-head action is unique because it hammers away at solid obstacles.
In a cramped workshop in Tanzania, Jonas Pastoli hammers away at a chandelier he has welded from scrap metal.
Demonstrating the sort of cinematic self-assurance that can only be summoned by a director confident in both his craft and his politics, John Sayles's new picture hammers away at the Bush Administration with artful abandon.
Inter Milan striker CHRISTIAN VIERI hammers away at a few people at the club for wanting to sell Hernan Crespo to Chelsea
Still, she hammers away at themes that both she and PWRDF have identified as being key.
According to the Religion News Service, ICES hammers away at environmentalists for their "faulty science and economics, strident street theater, and demands for immediate, drastic action on problems that are often hypothetical or overstated." Rabbi Lapin, a declaration signer, sums it up by saying, "When we embrace the strident messages of radical environmentalism, we are neither just, nor merciful, nor good stewards of the Earth, and we condemn the world's poorest people to continued misery and disease.
In one of the great panoramic set pieces of the English language--the famous chapter from his History on the condition of England in 1685--Macaulay sets out to cure the reader of any notion that the olden times were better: For page upon page he hammers away at the miserableness of the food, the lodgings, the roads, the communications, the sanitation; the badness of governance; the insecurity of person and property; the prevalence of disorder and crime.