halt

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Related to halts: condescension, so far, Counterparts

bring (someone or something) to a halt

To cause a person or thing to stop abruptly. The speeding police car, with its flashing lights and siren, brought all the other drivers to a halt. A sudden reduction in funding brought our research to a halt.
See also: bring, halt

call a halt to (something)

To order the end or stoppage of something. Stop all printing—the boss has called a halt to this project!
See also: call, halt

come to a halt

To stop abruptly. Every driver came to a halt as the police car, with its flashing lights and siren, sped by. Our research came to a halt after a sudden reduction in funding.
See also: come, halt

stop (someone or something) (dead) in its/(one's) tracks

To make someone or something stop or come to a complete halt immediately or very suddenly. Hearing the gunshot in the distance stopped us both dead in our tracks. Boy, Samantha could stop you in her tracks with her smile!
See also: stop, track

grind to a halt

To slowly stop. Our project will grind to a halt if the CEO pulls his approval.
See also: grind, halt

halt (someone or something) (dead) in its/(one's) tracks

To make someone or something stop or come to a complete halt immediately or very suddenly. Hearing the gunshot in the distance halted us both dead in our tracks. Boy, Samantha could halt you in her tracks with her smile!
See also: halt, track

put a halt to (something)

To cause something to stop or to cease or conclude something. I'm going to put a halt to the corruption in this department once and for all! I wish my parents would put a halt to their bickering and just be civil to one another! He really needs to put a halt to this lecture before everyone falls asleep.
See also: halt, put

bring someone or something to a halt

to cause someone or something to stop immediately. The explosion brought the lecture to a halt. I brought the visitor to a halt at the front gate.
See also: bring, halt

call a halt to something

to demand that something be stopped. We must call a halt to this childish behavior. The manager called a halt to all overtime.
See also: call, halt

come to a halt

to stop; to slow down and stop. Slowly, the train came to a halt. After the bus came to a halt, more people got on.
See also: come, halt

grind to a halt

Fig. to slow down and stop. Every day about noon, traffic in town grinds to a halt. The bus ground to a halt at the corner and someone got off.
See also: grind, halt

call a halt

Order something stopped, as in It was getting too dark to see the ball, so the referee called a halt to the match, or They'd played the march four times, so the conductor called a halt to the rehearsal. [Late 1800s]
See also: call, halt

come to a halt

Also, come to a standstill. Stop, either permanently or temporarily. For example, The sergeant ordered the men to come to a halt, or With the strike, construction came to a standstill. Both terms employ come to in the sense of "arrive at" or "reach," a usage dating from the 10th century. Also see come to, def. 2.
See also: come, halt

grind to a halt

Also, come to a grinding halt. Gradually come to a standstill or end. For example, Once the funding stopped, the refurbishing project ground to a halt, or She's come to a grinding halt with that book she's writing. This expression alludes to a clogged engine that gradually stops or a ship that runs aground.
See also: grind, halt

grind to a halt

COMMON
1. If a process or an activity grinds to a halt, it gradually becomes slower or less active until it stops. The peace process has ground to a halt.
2. If a vehicle grinds to a halt, it stops slowly and noisily. The tanks ground to a halt after a hundred yards because the fuel had run out.
3. If a country grinds to a halt, all transport in it stops so people are unable to do the things they usually do. The whole country grinds to a halt after an hour's snow.
See also: grind, halt

grind to a halt (or come to a grinding halt)

move more and more slowly and then stop.
1999 Times Traffic is expected to grind to a halt throughout the West Country as up to a million sightseers make the trip.
See also: grind, halt

call a ˈhalt (to something)

stop an activity: We must call a halt to people leaving work early without permission.
See also: call, halt

grind to a ˈhalt/ˈstandstill

,

come to a grinding ˈhalt

stop slowly: All work on the building has ground to a halt because of a shortage of materials.Every Friday night traffic comes to a grinding halt in Hammersmith.
This idiom refers to the way a very large machine slowly stops working, with some of its parts grinding (= rubbing) together.
See also: grind, halt, standstill

stop/halt somebody in their ˈtracks

,

stop/halt/freeze in your ˈtracks

suddenly make somebody stop by frightening or surprising them; suddenly stop because something has frightened or surprised you: The question stopped Alice in her tracks.The horse stopped dead in its tracks and refused to move.
See also: halt, somebody, stop, track

come to a grinding/screeching halt

Stop suddenly. Referring to the noise made by gears or brakes during a sudden stop, these phrases date from the second half of the 1900s. The National Observer of December 4, 1976, had: “A lot of that stuff is going to come to a screeching halt quickly, and we’re not going to do the screeching.” It is also put as grind to a halt.
See also: come, grind, halt, screech

grind to a halt, to

See come to a grinding halt.
See also: grind
References in periodicals archive ?
"My letter references the halt at the Lower Woodstock side of the Albertbridge Road, South Belfast.
"I have never made any representations about the name of the halt at Short Strand, East Belfast on the other side of the Albertbridge Road.
A Translink spokesman said yesterday: "The new Glider halt replaces a Metro stop named 'Short Strand'."
We will use variants of both approaches in this study of trading halts. While minimizing trade-to-trade price changes appears, on the surface, to be a worthy objective of the market maker, equally important in demonstrating market efficiency would be minimizing intra- and inter-day movements in stock prices.
Because trading halts are supposed to reduce market inefficiencies during relatively unique periods, the fundamental market model (composed of just the terms in the bracket) may be insufficient to capture the unique events in a volatile market.
In order to evaluate the merits of trading halts on market performance during a volatile market period, we chose a period of dramatic and unquestioned price volatility characterized by heavy trading volume and market uncertainty--the opening of the markets on October 20, 1987 on the day following the steepest decline in the market in almost 60 years.
To evaluate the effects of trading halts on market efficiency and price continuity, we compare heavily traded issues on the specialist NYSE system with the competitive NASDAQ market maker system.
To examine the effects of trading halts on abnormal returns--an indication of market inefficiency from what ever source--we used data on the time of opening of these securities on Tuesday, October 20, 1987.(3) As the accompanying table shows, the mean delay for NYSE stocks in opening after the formal market opening was 19.33 minutes (19 minutes, 19.8 seconds) while the mean lag for NASDAQ stocks was 2.09 minutes (2 minutes, 5.4 seconds).
In Table 2, we present the abnormal return data comparing NYSE issues with NASDAQ traded issues, comparing different degrees of lateness for only NYSE issues and comparing trading halts using the entire sample.
Comparing stocks with trading halts of 3 minutes or more against stocks with trading halts of less than 3 minutes (the no trading halt sample), the halted sample rose over 3 percent relative to the market during the period of halt.
In short, these data overwhelmingly indicate that trading halts do not increase market efficiency.
It has been argued that "system overload" which results in trading halts often cause security prices to diverge from equilibrium.
As the last section provided empirical evidence rejecting the conclusion that trading halts reduce "unnecessary price fluctuations" in the context of the market pricing model, the current section will use the literature's methodology concerning market maker costs in order to evaluate the performance of the NYSE and NASDAQ market makers during this period of temporary system overload.
Our findings support much of the earlier research concerning trading halts and excess returns in the sense that abnormal returns occur during periods of trading halts.
Thus, the evidence is not consistent with the hypothesis that trading halts will increase market efficiency and help produce a "fair and orderly" market.
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