hackle

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(one's) hackles rise

One becomes greatly irritated, annoyed, or aggravated. The disrespect he showed our professor during class made my hackles rise so badly that I had to go take a walk to calm down. I could see her hackles rising at the suggestion of reducing her hours at work.
See also: hackle, rise

get (one's) hackles up

To become or cause to become angry, hostile, defensive, or irritable. John got his hackles up when his parents brought up the subject of college. Election season always gets my dad's hackles up.
See also: get, hackle, up

make (someone's) hackles rise

To greatly irritate, annoy, or aggravate someone. The disrespect he showed our professor during class made my hackles rise so badly that I had to go take a walk to calm down. The politician has a gift for making his opponents' hackles rise during debates.
See also: hackle, make, rise

raise (one's) hackles

To greatly irritate, annoy, or aggravate one. The disrespect he showed our professor during class raised my hackles so badly that I had to go take a walk to calm down. The politician has a gift for raising his opponents' hackles during debates.
See also: hackle, raise
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

get someone's dander up

 and get someone's back up; get someone's hackles up; get someone's Irish up; put someone's back up
Fig. to make someone get angry. (Fixed order.) Now, don't get your dander up. Calm down. I insulted him and really got his hackles up. Bob had his Irish up all day yesterday. I don't know what was wrong. Now, now, don't get your back up. I didn't mean any harm.
See also: dander, get, up
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

raise one's hackles

Make one very angry, as in That really raised my hackles when he pitched straight at the batter's head. Hackles are the hairs on the back of an animal's neck, which stick up when the animal feels fearful or angry. [Late 1800s]
See also: hackle, raise
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

raise someone's hackles

COMMON If something raises your hackles, it makes you angry. The taxes will be designed not to raise voters' hackles too much. Note: You can also say that something raises hackles if it makes people angry. Certainly Smedley's pay packet of $1 million-plus would have raised a few hackles among the medical profession. Note: When something makes you angry or annoyed, you can say that your hackles rise. My hackles rose when I read his letter. Note: `Hackles' are feathers on the necks of cockerels and some other birds. They rise up when the bird becomes aggressive.
See also: hackle, raise
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

make someone's hackles rise

make someone angry or indignant.
Hackles are the long feathers on the neck of a fighting cock or the hairs on the top of a dog's neck, which are raised when the animal is angry or excited.
See also: hackle, make, rise
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

your, his, etc. ˈhackles rise

become angry: Ben felt his hackles rise as the speaker continued.
See also: hackle, rise

make somebody’s ˈhackles rise

,

raise ˈhackles

make somebody angry: He really makes my hackles rise, that man. He’s so rude to everybody.Her remarks certainly raised hackles.
Hackles are the hairs on the back of a dog’s neck that rise when it is angry or excited.
See also: hackle, make, rise
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

get (one's) hackles up

To be extremely insulted or irritated.
See also: get, hackle, up
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

raise one's hackles, to

To arouse one’s anger. The hackles are the hair on the back of an animal’s neck that sticks straight up with excitement, fear, or other strong emotion. “With the hackles up,” meaning on the point of fighting, was transferred to humans in the late nineteenth century. “I almost saw the hackles of a good old squire rise,” wrote Edward Pennell-Elmhirst (The Cream of Leicestershire, 1883).
See also: raise, to
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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