hackle

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(one's) hackles rise

One becomes greatly irritated, annoyed, or aggravated. The disrespect he showed our professor during class made my hackles rise so badly that I had to go take a walk to calm down. I could see her hackles rising at the suggestion of reducing her hours at work.
See also: hackle, rise

get (one's) hackles up

To become or cause to become angry, hostile, defensive, or irritable. John got his hackles up when his parents brought up the subject of college. Election season always gets my dad's hackles up.
See also: get, hackle, up

make (someone's) hackles rise

To greatly irritate, annoy, or aggravate someone. The disrespect he showed our professor during class made my hackles rise so badly that I had to go take a walk to calm down. The politician has a gift for making his opponents' hackles rise during debates.
See also: hackle, make, rise

raise (one's) hackles

To greatly irritate, annoy, or aggravate one. The disrespect he showed our professor during class raised my hackles so badly that I had to go take a walk to calm down. The politician has a gift for raising his opponents' hackles during debates.
See also: hackle, raise

get someone's dander up

 and get someone's back up; get someone's hackles up; get someone's Irish up; put someone's back up
Fig. to make someone get angry. (Fixed order.) Now, don't get your dander up. Calm down. I insulted him and really got his hackles up. Bob had his Irish up all day yesterday. I don't know what was wrong. Now, now, don't get your back up. I didn't mean any harm.
See also: dander, get, up

raise one's hackles

Make one very angry, as in That really raised my hackles when he pitched straight at the batter's head. Hackles are the hairs on the back of an animal's neck, which stick up when the animal feels fearful or angry. [Late 1800s]
See also: hackle, raise

raise someone's hackles

COMMON If something raises your hackles, it makes you angry. The taxes will be designed not to raise voters' hackles too much. Note: You can also say that something raises hackles if it makes people angry. Certainly Smedley's pay packet of $1 million-plus would have raised a few hackles among the medical profession. Note: When something makes you angry or annoyed, you can say that your hackles rise. My hackles rose when I read his letter. Note: `Hackles' are feathers on the necks of cockerels and some other birds. They rise up when the bird becomes aggressive.
See also: hackle, raise

make someone's hackles rise

make someone angry or indignant.
Hackles are the long feathers on the neck of a fighting cock or the hairs on the top of a dog's neck, which are raised when the animal is angry or excited.
See also: hackle, make, rise

your, his, etc. ˈhackles rise

become angry: Ben felt his hackles rise as the speaker continued.
See also: hackle, rise

make somebody’s ˈhackles rise

,

raise ˈhackles

make somebody angry: He really makes my hackles rise, that man. He’s so rude to everybody.Her remarks certainly raised hackles.
Hackles are the hairs on the back of a dog’s neck that rise when it is angry or excited.
See also: hackle, make, rise

get (one's) hackles up

To be extremely insulted or irritated.
See also: get, hackle, up

raise one's hackles, to

To arouse one’s anger. The hackles are the hair on the back of an animal’s neck that sticks straight up with excitement, fear, or other strong emotion. “With the hackles up,” meaning on the point of fighting, was transferred to humans in the late nineteenth century. “I almost saw the hackles of a good old squire rise,” wrote Edward Pennell-Elmhirst (The Cream of Leicestershire, 1883).
See also: raise
References in periodicals archive ?
Charlie Collins of Hackle Farm in Vine City, N.Y., told me that he raises roosters to produce grizzly, brown and white hackles for tying the traditional Catskill fly colors.
The laminations are confined within individual horizontal bands; that is, they initiate at the top of the band, are truncated at the base, but cross-cut the crescentic hackles described above.
"I'm not a trendsetter, I'm not a hair fashion designer, I'm a chicken farmer," said Keough, who raises about 25,000 roosters with the desired hackles.
But Army chiefs now want them all to wear a purple hackle in a bid to promote unity.
He also described Deputy Prime Minister John Prescott arriving "at the embassy like a mastiff with his hackles up".
Indeed, there is very little here that would raise the hackles of the dominant majority in today's USA.
In the UK, where Wallinger's track record is better known and the more obviously politicized foundations (circa '80s to early '90s) of his recent work are assumed, Buchloh's summary condemnation must have raised as many hackles as eyebrows.
A car like the XJR is a billboard that says, "I'm rich." But the XJR didn't seem to raise too many hackles along my humble routes.
The report raises the hackles of some zoo professionals.
A recent accounting change involving shareholders' interest has raised the hackles of private companies and threatens to put them at a competitive disadvantage with their public rivals--though the immediate threat of the change has been removed.
Ohio Governor Taft's anticipated proposal to increase the state beer tax has raised hackles at Miller Brewing Co.'s Trenton, OH brewery.
Poggio's work raised hackles in Ferrara, where the cult of Caesar was particularly strong.
However, the town's diversification strategy has raised the hackles of environmental activists in the Timiskaming district who battled Temagami logging, the Adams Mine landfill and now the town's proposed hazardous waste incinerator by Bennett Environmental Inc.
ITEM: Wisconsin's Green Bay Press-Gazette for January 7th reported: "A Washington, D.C., environmental group has raised hackles in the farming community by publicizing information farmers are used to considering private."
But the proposed regulations have raised the hackles of environmental groups and mining companies alike.