bastardly gullion

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bastardly gullion

obsolete An extremely vile, despicable, and/or worthless person; a person of low birth or esteem; the bastard son of a bastard. "Guillion," a dialectical variation of "cullion," is an archaic term for a contemptible, mean-spirited, or vulgar person; "bastardly" is used to further emphasize this. The scoundrel, the bastardly gullion! He has robbed us of all we own, and after we had the decency of giving him shelter for a night!
References in periodicals archive ?
MAKE WAVES THE GIANT'S LAIR, SLIEVE GULLION This woodland walk features a trail of intertwined fairy houses and arts features creating a childhood land with dragons, giants and fairies.
Christina Gullion believes keeping Earth habitable in the face of a changing climate is more important than searching for other planets.
There is always the issue of primary custody of the "children," and in the case of public diplomacy, there is no avoiding the North American legacy of soft power as coined by Harvard professor and former Assistant Secretary of Defense Joseph Nye or the first use of the term public diplomacy by retired US ambassador Edmund Gullion at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University.
Mr Malone added: "The tourism industry needs to be able to plan with certainty when it comes to long-term investment in the Gullion and Cooley Mourne region.
Gullion, the army's provost marshal general, had deemed such a program "inadvisable" and the plan was summarily shelved.
Nicholas Ga, Gullion Cm, Koro Ce, EphrossSa, Brown Jb, Et Al.
Looking at "October 1950" now, I can see it's this question about identity, its complex whatever-ness, that is most prevalent in this new book of poems by Muldoon--his 15th by my count--about travel, history, theater, mortality, blues, film, and the Irish bog "fenced up there on Slieve Gullion.
99 WATCH David Walliams's Mr Stink come to life at the Slieve Gullion Forest Park in Newry, County Down on July 7.
Mayor Daire Hughes commended the work in particular of the Culloville Development Association who had the foresight to develop such an exciting project and to Councillors and officials within the Slieve Gullion area who guided, advised and lobbied for them throughout the process.
According to Gullion, Caffey had come to his office sometime between November 1937 and April 1938 and told Gullion that