guilt

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absolve from guilt

To consider innocent, clear of all suspicion, or pardon from any cause of guilt. The knights of the crusades committed many atrocities in their campaign, but they were absolved from guilt by the heads of the church.
See also: absolve, guilt

absolved from guilt

Considered innocent, cleared of all suspicion, or pardoned from any cause of guilt. The knights of the crusades committed many atrocities in their campaign, but they were regarded as absolved from guilt because of their religious patronage.
See also: absolve, guilt

eaten up with (something)

Obsessed, overcome, or preoccupied with some negative emotion. I've been eaten up with anger ever since I found out that my co-worker totally sabotaged me for that promotion. I'm really worried about Wendy—she's still eaten up with guilt over what happened.
See also: eaten, up

guilt complex

A very strong and persistent feeling of guilt regarding something or some event. John developed a guilt complex after forcing his brother to move out.
See also: guilt

guilt trip

1. noun A deep feeling of guilt or remorse. I'm having a guilt trip for not being able to attend my sister's wedding.
2. verb To make others feel guilty, especially in an attempt to manipulate them. Kelly's parents were always trying to guilt trip her for not giving them grandchildren. You can't guilt trip me into donating money, I give enough to charity already.
See also: guilt, trip

lay a guilt trip on (one)

To make one feel guilty, especially in an attempt to manipulate. Kelly's parents were always trying to lay a guilt trip on her for not giving them grandchildren. These charity commercials are really laying a guilt trip on me. I guess that's a sign I should donate.
See also: guilt, lay, on, trip

put a guilt trip on (one)

To make one feel guilty, especially in an attempt to manipulate. Kelly's parents were always trying to put a guilt trip on her for not giving them grandchildren. These charity commercials are really putting a guilt trip on me. I guess that's a sign I should donate.
See also: guilt, on, put, trip

racked with guilt

Suffering from, preoccupied by, or paralyzed with an intense and overwhelming feeling of guilt. I've been racked with guilt every since I took that bribe. I don't know how people can take advantage of others like that. If it were me, I'd be racked with guilt for doing something so heinous.
See also: guilt, rack

send (one) on a guilt trip

To make one feel guilty, especially in an attempt to manipulate. Kelly's parents were always trying to send her on a guilt trip for not giving them grandchildren. These charity commercials are really sending me on a guilt trip. I guess that's a sign I should donate.
See also: guilt, on, send, trip

a ˈguilt trip

(informal) things you say to somebody in order to make them feel guilty about something: Don’t lay a guilt trip on your child about schoolwork.
See also: guilt, trip

lay a (heavy) trip on someone

1. tv. to criticize someone. There’s no need to lay a trip on me. I agree with you.
2. tv. to confuse or astonish someone. After he laid a heavy trip on me about how the company is almost broke, I cleaned out my desk and left.
3. and lay a guilt trip on someone tv. to attempt to make someone feel very guilty. Why do you have to lay a guilt trip on me? Why don’t you go to a shrink? Keep your problems to yourself. Don’t lay a trip on me!
See also: heavy, lay, on, someone, trip

lay a guilt trip on someone

verb
See also: guilt, lay, on, someone, trip

lay a guilt trip on

To make or try to make (someone) feel guilty.
See also: guilt, lay, on, trip
References in periodicals archive ?
I wanted them to know that I felt a certain guilt, one that I accepted as genuinely my own, that I wanted to grow from.
And, actually, the existence of innocence in black boys -- or, rather, the moment at which guilt is bestowed upon black boys is very interesting to me right now.
Link: In every one of your novels, you develop conflicting ideas such as guilt and innocence, gentleness and rage, hero and outlaw, wholeness and emptiness, and, in West of Rehobeth, hope and despair.
The book's title suggests that the poems are about innocence, yet the poems are actually about outlaws, guilt, and shame, with the exception of the last poem, "innocent." Can you explain this paradox?
Pate: I began this whole exploration of innocence by exploring the nature of guilt. In Losing Absalom, Sonny feels guilty because he's a black man working in the corporate world in Minnesota.
Link: Feeling everybody else's guilt because you were black?
I also realized that you have to understand guilt to understand innocence.
No matter what other powers we have, they are undermined by the assumption of our guilt.
He probes the nature of guilt that African American men feel as a result of the societal stereotypes that mark them as villains, as outlaws in his collection of poems innocent (1998) and in his recent novel The Multicultiboho Sideshow (1999).
With compassion as well as a wry, withering wit, he follows the intriguing twists and turns by which a movement driven by parents' guilt and pediatricians' good intentions led not only to research funding and national legislation but also to journalistic hyperbole and genetic findings that only compounded the parental guilt and anxieties the movement meant to relieve.