grunt

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Related to grunts: roars, chatters

grunt

1. slang One who is servile, often due to lacking power or prestige in a particular setting. Get one of those grunts to do all this filing for you.
2. slang A common soldier, typically of the infantry. Come on, grunts, get in formation!
3. slang A wrestler. I never expected my son to grow up to be some grunt in a wrestling ring.
4. slang A diligent, industrious student. I'm confident she'll get an A in this class—she's one of the grunts.
5. slang A burp. My goodness, Tommy, that was a loud grunt!

grunt out

To say something in a labored or brusque manner. A noun or pronoun can be used between "grunt" and "out." Luckily, the patient managed to grunt out her symptoms before collapsing. The boss grunted her coffee order out, and I sent my intern to fetch it.
See also: grunt, out

grunt work

Work that is menial and often tedious. Get one of those interns to do this grunt work—that's what they're here for!
See also: grunt, work
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

grunt something out

to say something with a snort or grunt. Jane grunted a command out to someone. She grunted out a curt command and the gate opened.
See also: grunt, out

grunt work

Fig. work that is menial and thankless. During the summer, I earned money doing grunt work. I did all of the grunt work on the project, but my boss got all of the credit.
See also: grunt, work
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

grunt

(grənt)
1. n. an infantry soldier. (Military. From the gutteral sound made by a pig, and anyone doing very heavy labor.) Get those grunts out on the field at sunrise!
2. n. a low-ranking or subservient person. (Someone who is likely to utter a grunt because of the discomforts of menial labor.) Let’s hire a grunt to do this kind of work.
3. n. a belch. Does that grunt mean you like my cooking?
4. n. a hardworking student. The grunts got Bs on the test. It was that hard!
5. n. a wrestler. (Possibly in reference to a grunting pig.) Two big grunts wearing outlandish costumes performed for the television cameras.

grunt work

and shit work
n. hard, menial labor; tedious work. (Work that a lesser person ought to be doing.) Who is supposed to do the grunt work around here? Not me! Why am I always doing the shit work?
See also: grunt, work
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The pig-like grunt is classically associated with the rut, and any rewed-up buck hearing the call is inclined to investigate.
I knew I had just grunted in a great buck, but I soon realized I had smooth talked a nearly 200-inch deer right to my tree.
I was perched 18 feet up on a hardwood ridge leading to an open swamp bottom, and I decided to give a little "toot" on my grunt tube.
After this humbling delivery, one grunt unloaded the bales.
Asabere-Ameyaw (2001) reported the sex ratio of big eye grunt Brachydeuterus auritus off Cape coast Ghana, which was in contrast to the result obtained in this study, the females were more than the males.
The call consists of a low grunt with the addition of 1 to 4 short, rapid snorts.
One would think, as Anil said above, that the grunts would be very old.
When the four grunts coming from behind us, to the northwest, ended, a second set of grunts came from in front of us, to the southwest.
It's normal to puff a bit when you hit the shot but I really don't know why she (Sharapova) has to grunt that loud.
"Pat Gleason, like many noncommissioned sergeants and warrant officers I would meet in the course of my travels, was quietly amazing" Another grunt "looked like the all-American kid on a milk carton." "Every aspect of his lined face and short, wiry body seemed hard and chiseled....
David, from Newport, drummer in the Gladiator star's Aussie band 30 Odd Foot of Grunts, said: "I've known Russell for eight years and he's become a really good friend, as have the rest of the band.
Informally, they were known affectionately as grunts.
The idea of an officer remaining in the same position for many years helps to perpetuate the concept of a "grunt." While the term sounds derogatory in nature, a grunt is simply one who delivers the goods.(3) In fact, the grunts of the organization determine the success or failure of the department.
Grunts, bleats, and bawls are vocalizations deer use for various purposes.
The authors' approach to this question is predicated on the assumption that if NHL teams employ two different categories of player, grunts (the summary term used here for the physical player) and non-grunts (skill players), the NHL salary structure should reflect this.