grown


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grow by leaps and bounds

To rapidly grow or expand. Our small company has grown by leaps and bounds over the past year, thanks in no small part to our aggressive new marketing campaign. Our puppy has grown by leaps and bounds since we switched to a new brand of dog food.
See also: and, bound, by, grow, leap

grow like Topsy

To rapidly grow or expand. Our small company has grown like Topsy over the past year, thanks in no small part to our aggressive new marketing campaign. Our puppy has grown like Topsy since we switched to a new brand of dog food.
See also: grow, like, Topsy

grow on trees

Become available freely or without effort. Typically used in the phrase "money doesn't grow on trees." I can't believe you would spend your entire allowance on a silly video game. Money doesn't grow on trees, you know!
See also: grow, on, tree

grow up

1. verb To become older and more mature; to progress toward adulthood. When I grow up, I want to be an astronaut Growing up with three older brothers probably did a lot to shape my personality.
2. verb To arise or emerge. Protests have grown up all across the nation in response to that incident.
3. expression An imperative to be more mature, typically directed at someone exhibiting what the speaker considers to be extremely immature behavior. Oh, grow up and take some responsibility for your actions. Ugh, you guys are so immature! Grow up!
See also: grow, up

have grown whiskers

To be old, as of a story or joke. No one laughed at your story because it had grown whiskers by then.
See also: grown, have, whisker

grow apart

1. Literally, to grow and move away from something. Wow, those bushes have really grown apart since we bought the place.
2. To experience a lessening of emotional intimacy in a relationship over time. Of course I still care about Ed—we've just grown apart over the years. We hardly even talk anymore.
See also: apart, grow

grow away from (someone or something)

1. Literally, to grow and move away from something. Wow, those bushes have really grown away from each other since we bought the place.
2. To experience a lessening of emotional intimacy in a relationship over time. Of course I still care about Ed—we've just grown away from each other over the years. We hardly even talk anymore.
3. To become less dependent on someone. I knew the kids would grow away from us, but I guess I just didn't expect it to happen so soon.
See also: away, grow

grow back

To return to a previous length or degree of growth, as after having been cut or trimmed. I know you're not thrilled with your new haircut, but don't worry, it's just hair—it'll grow back. When do you think that part of the bush will grow back? I didn't realize how much it was hiding our ugly porch.
See also: back, grow

grow down

To move downward through or into something over time. Typically said of roots. The roots of that tree better not be growing down into our sewer pipe!
See also: down, grow

grow from (something)

1. To develop from a particular starting point or thing. Usually said of plants. What do tulips grow from? Bulbs?
2. To change and mature after having had a particular experience. That break-up was really painful, but I did grow from it—now, I only date people who truly care about me.
See also: grow

grow over (something)

To extend over something, covering it. Often said of flora. Oh wow, I didn't realize how much the moss had grown over this wall.
See also: grow, over

grow to (do something)

To slowly begin to do something or feel a certain way over time. Ian annoyed me at first, but I really grew to like him as we spent more time together. Every young adult grows to want more freedom from their family—that's just how it is. Grandma grew to hate the cold and eventually moved to Florida.
See also: grow

grow together

(of things) To physically move closer together and connect or intertwine over time. That big bush out front is actually two smaller bushes that grew together. Molly, you have to wear a cast so that your broken bone grows together.
See also: grow, together

grow up into (something)

To become a particular type of person as one ages and matures. Wow, Julie has really grown up into a very poised young woman. I can't believe she's already 16!
See also: grow, up

grow apart

 (from someone or something)
1. Lit. [for things] to separate as they grow. These trees tend to grow apart from each other as they get bigger. They need to grow apart so they won't be too crowded.
2. Fig. [for people] to separate from one another gradually. Over the years, they grew apart from each other. Ted and Sharon grew apart and saw less and less of each other.
See also: apart, grow

grow back

[for something that has come off] to grow back again. (Includes parts of plants and some animals, fingernails, toenails, etc.) The lizard's tail grew back in a few months. The leaves will grow back in a month or so.
See also: back, grow

grow down (into something)

[for roots] to penetrate downward as they grow. The young roots grew down into the rich soil. The roots grew down and drew up the precious water.
See also: down, grow

grow together

[for things] to join together as they grow and develop. Two of these trees grew together when they were much smaller. The broken ends of the bone grew together far more rapidly than Chuck had thought.
See also: grow, together

grow up

to become mature; to become adult. All the children have grown up and the parents are left with a lot of debts.
See also: grow, up

grow up

1. Become an adult, as in Sam wants to be a policeman when he grows up. [First half of 1500s]
2. Come into existence, arise, as in Similar social problems grew up in all the big cities. [Late 1500s]
3. Become mature or sensible, as in It's time you grew up and faced the facts. This usage may also be in the form of an imperative (as in Don't bite your nails-grow up!) [Mid-1900s]
See also: grow, up

grow on trees

be plentiful or easily obtained.
1996 Nozipo Maraire Zenzele Children these days think that money grows on trees!
See also: grow, on, tree

grow like ˈTopsy

grow very fast, particularly in an unplanned or uncontrolled way: After many contributions, our website has grown like Topsy, and is now being completely revised.Topsy was a female character in Harriet Beecher Stowe’s novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin.
See also: grow, like, Topsy

grow up

v.
To become an adult: I want to be a teacher when I grow up.
See also: grow, up

grow like Topsy

Grow very quickly. This phrase alludes to the little African-American slave girl in Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin (1851), who when asked where she came from, replied, “I ’spect I growed. Don’t think nobody never made me.”
See also: grow, like, Topsy
References in periodicals archive ?
Rainforest Alliance also cautions that some higher-yield shade coffees are now being grown with only a few species of trees, making them less valuable for biodiversity.
That the coffee is grown in harmony with nature shows in the lower average yields of about 4,989 pounds per acre, versus 7,484 to 9,978 pounds per acre in an average non-organic coffee farm with intensive use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides.
This mountain area is fortunate to have many chefs that appreciate and seek the special flavors of Appalachian grown foods.
The former grains the security of knowing he or she has been paid for a portion of the harvest and the farmer's "community" participates in how and where their food is grown.
Not only will they keep for months, but they also can be added to a garden or grown continuously in pots.
Each growing tree annually produces a new ring of cells, which consists of a relatively wide, light ring grown during the productive seasons of spring and summer, and a thinner, darker ring grown during the harsher months of autumn or winter.
Henderson County, NC produces over eighty percent of the apples grown in the state (with much of the rest coming from other western North Carolina counties) and is the seventh largest apple producing county in the United States.
Grown in open fields in full sun, coffee trees have doubled their yield, but at a high cost to the environment (see "Singing for Songbirds," In Briefs, July/August 2000).
Grown from seed the trees will reach 20 feet in 10 years.
Sugar maples, they report, increase photosynthetic carbon dioxide uptake by 20 percent (per unit weight) when grown in 650 parts per million (ppm) carbon dioxide instead of the 350-ppm level representative of ambient conditions.