grow apart


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grow apart

1. Literally, to grow and move away from something. Wow, those bushes have really grown apart since we bought the place.
2. To experience a lessening of emotional intimacy in a relationship over time. Of course I still care about Ed—we've just grown apart over the years. We hardly even talk anymore.
See also: apart, grow

grow apart

 (from someone or something)
1. Lit. [for things] to separate as they grow. These trees tend to grow apart from each other as they get bigger. They need to grow apart so they won't be too crowded.
2. Fig. [for people] to separate from one another gradually. Over the years, they grew apart from each other. Ted and Sharon grew apart and saw less and less of each other.
See also: apart, grow
References in periodicals archive ?
Thicke revealed that they weren't happy together anymore and added that there was a hundred different reasons and not just one and it didn't work for 20 years because sometimes people grow apart. ( ANI )
It will aid your recovery if you can understand people can love and value each other at one point in time and grow apart when their needs and priorities shift.
A friend said he did not want to be at sea and grow apart from seven- year-old Bea and six-year-old Eugenie.
"You kind of grow apart but I wouldn't say a bad word about Clodagh, she's a wonderful woman.
But worlds grow apart, people change and people want to go in different directions."
Bjorn says they simply grew apart, adding: "We got married quite young and, after 10 years, you find out you're different and you grow apart. It happens to so many people."
Mrs Northam said there is a risk the age difference will lead the couple to grow apart.
A YOU don't say how long you've been together but sadly, many couples do simply grow apart. Finding yourself at tracted to your workmate may have brought these doubts to the surface more quickly.
'If you don't update your relationship with someone, you grow apart.'
Paul Heritage of food maker Aunt Bessie's, who polled 2,000 adults, said: "It seems every day pressures are causing families to grow apart."
The chances are they'll grow apart as their interests change anyway, so there's no point in forcing them.' Evie Henson, 17, Newport
You might grow apart because of changes you go through, like one of you matures faster than the other.
"I think we kind of grew apart, I mean there was a lot of love in the relationship, but we did kind of grow apart, and neither of us could really understand why but we just kind of did," she said.
"It's too easy to grow apart. My parents have been married 40 years, Lee's 30.