gross

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gross-out

1. modifier Eliciting a strong feeling of disgust or revulsion, usually intentionally. With its paper-thin plot and gross-out humor, this movie will only appeal to the most juvenile of audiences.
2. noun Some thing, event, or situation that elicits a strong feeling of disgust or revulsion, whether intentionally or not. That new horror movie isn't even scary, it's just trying to be a big gross-out. There's a piece of meat in the fridge that's completely rotten. What a gross-out!

gross out

To disgust or repulse (someone). A noun or pronoun can be used between "gross" and "out." I could never be a nurse—blood just grosses me out too much. I was really grossed out by that movie. The gore was so disgusting.
See also: gross, out

by the gross

In large quantities. Although this definition is broad, a "gross," when used as a unit of measure, equals 12 dozen. We definitely have more paper towels somewhere in the house—my mom practically buys them by the gross.
See also: by, gross

so gross

(That is) very disgusting, nauseating, or repellant. A: "I stepped in dog poo while I was out for my walk." B: "So gross! People who don't pick up after their dogs should be put in jail!" Your room is so gross. Do you ever clean?
See also: gross

gross someone out

to disgust someone. Those horrible pictures just gross me out. Jim's story totally grossed out Sally.
See also: gross, out

so gross

Sl. How disgusting! He put chocolate syrup on his pie! So gross! He's barfing! So gross!
See also: gross

gross one out

Disgust or revolt one, as in Chewing gum in church grosses me out, or His explicit language grossed her out. [Slang; mid-1900s]
See also: gross, one, out

by the gross

in large numbers or amounts.
A gross was formerly widely used as a unit of quantity equal to twelve dozen; the word comes from the French gross douzaine , which literally means ‘large dozen’.
See also: by, gross

gross out

v. Slang
To fill someone with disgust; nauseate someone: The pizza they serve at school grosses me out. The gory pictures grossed out our friends.
See also: gross, out

gross

(gros)
mod. crude; vulgar; disgusting. (Slang only when overused.) What a gross thing to even suggest.

gross someone out

tv. to disgust someone. Jim’s story totally grossed out Sally.
See also: gross, out, someone

gross-out

1. n. something disgusting. That horror movie was a real gross-out.
2. mod. disgusting; gross. What a gross-out day this has been!

So gross!

exclam. How disgusting! (California.) He put chocolate syrup on his pie! So gross!
References in periodicals archive ?
At the moment we assume 60mph, which is obviously grossly in excess of the appropriate speed limit for safety.
Trying to take care of autistic kid brother Arnie (Leonardo DiCaprio), who likes to climb the town water tower, and a grossly obese mother (Darlene Cares) who never comes out of the front parlor, Gilbert falls in love with a girl (Juliette Lewis) who is traveling gypsy-like across America in a trailer.
Urhausen's malicious attack on the Russel Creek Neighbors was disrespectful, grossly inaccurate and rude.
Antibiotics are grossly overused, in doctors' offices, in hospitals, and on the farm.
Another way of putting it is that they grossly overestimated the number of dissenters, and underestimated those loyal to Catholic teaching.
The argument equating 'an inherited basis of behaviour which originally evolved to ensure [our] survival' with landscape preference and experience is apt, but to simultaneously equate it with aesthetics and the beautiful is grossly over-simplistic.
That return must have a substantial understatement of tax attributable to a grossly erroneous item of the spouse at fault.
Unfortunately, they are grossly misunderstood and discriminated, and are subjected to regular humiliation, rude behavior, social prejudices and even life-threatening physical attacks leading to death and injury.
I find this grossly unfair but now feel I have nowhere to turn.
A PIBA spokesman said: "[It's a] relief since it was a grossly inequitable tax on the pensions savings of private sector workers primarily.
This is grossly unfair and I will continue to seek support for the Fair Funding Campaign for West Midlands Police Service.
In an address to London School of Economics on the issue of social media, DPP Keir Starmer QC responded to an audience member who asked: "Is it an offence to re-tweet something grossly offensive?
A TEENAGER denied posting a grossly offensive message on Facebook about the deaths of six British soldiers in Afghanistan.
Analysis of the social status of many grossly overweight people shows that many are on low incomes.