groovy

(redirected from grooviness)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to grooviness: grooviest

feel groovy

1. in. to feel really good and mellow. It’s a beautiful day, and I really feel groovy.
2. in. to be alcohol or drug intoxicated. Looks like Kelly is feeling groovy on gin again.
See also: feel, groovy

groovy

1. mod. cool; pleasant. Man, this music is groovy.
2. mod. drug intoxicated. (Drugs.) Three beers and he was a little groovy.
3. mod. out-of-date; passé. (California.) Oh, how groovy!
References in periodicals archive ?
In Burt's case, it is a quest for the new and hip which then, in turn, becomes nothing but a source of self-flagellation, of a premature fear of irrelevance: no academic interested in popular culture is directly motivated by anything but a desperate hope of grooviness, just as for Lanier no reader reads differently because of social determinants.
When these lecturing pathogens wish to demonstrate their grooviness, they speak of how in the future classroom computers and online learning may be used to "eliminate discrepancies in teaching practices and provide highly accurate deep diagnosis.
If you walked into your work on Thursday morning having lost the power of speech because you were so overwhelmed by their grooviness against Costa Rica, step into the former category.
But like any locality, New York is not without its own brand of provincialism: grooviness passing for relevance.
At any one time there were maybe fifty candles burning, some big, some tiny, some perfumed, some whose wicks sparkled or fumed in reds and blues, giving the unvented room a gnostic smokiness of empowering psychegloom and meditative grooviness.
Iconic potter, designer, author, and TV personality Jonathan Adler is dedicated to bringing style, craft, joy, and a general feeling of grooviness to your home.
Expanding beyond Alan Moore's seminal superheroes-as-fascists book, Watchmen, Ellis' story is a reminder that even under the cover of grooviness, power corrupts and superhuman power corrupts superhumanly.
The album further pushes the band's sonic boundaries to find such oddball gems as the hard-driving twitch of "The Ripper," the damaged chamber-music tones of "The Bird and the Worm," the nasty, insistent stomp of "Paralyzed," the stripped-down punk of "Liar Liar (Burn in Hell)" and dream-pop AM-radio grooviness of "Smother Me.
Although ridiculed by some, Barbarella became a symbol of late 1960s grooviness.
There's 15 other examples of their grooviness here.