groove

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be in a groove

1. To be immersed in a particular task and thus working smoothly and efficiently. Now that I'm in a groove, I think I'll be able to finish this paper tonight—ahead of schedule! If I'm in a groove, I can clean for hours.
2. To become seemingly trapped or stuck in a mundane, non-changing pattern of life, work, and/or personal behavior. In this usage, "stuck" can be used after the conjugated form of "be." I had so many ambitions when I first graduated from college, but now I feel like I'm in a groove. We're stuck in a groove—let's move abroad for the summer and shake things up!
See also: groove

be in the groove

1. To be immersed in a particular task and thus working smoothly and efficiently. Now that I'm in the groove, I think I'll be able to finish this paper tonight—ahead of schedule! If I'm in the groove, I can clean for hours.
2. To experience a particularly successful period. Three championship titles in a row? Wow, that team is really in the groove.
See also: groove

get (one's) groove on

slang To dance and enjoy oneself. After such a long week, why don't we go get our groove on at a club tonight?
See also: get, groove, on

get in the groove

To be immersed in a particular task and thus working smoothly and efficiently. Now that I've gotten in the groove, I think I'll be able to finish this paper tonight—ahead of schedule! Once I get in the groove, I can clean for hours.
See also: get, groove

groove on (someone or something)

To have a strong interest in someone or something. Those cute guys are looking this way again—I think they're grooving on us! I knew I wanted to study art, but I didn't expect to groove on textile design so much.
See also: groove, on

grooved

slang Happy and content. Being on vacation sure has Tim grooved—he's currently asleep on a blanket in the sand.
See also: groove

grooving

1. slang Dancing. Look at that older couple just grooving in the middle of the dance floor—they're adorable.
2. slang Having a good time. We're just hanging out and grooving—come join us!
See also: groove

in the groove

1. Immersed in a particular task and thus working smoothly and efficiently. Now that I'm in the groove, I think I'll be able to finish this paper tonight—ahead of schedule! If I'm in the groove, I can clean for hours.
2. Experiencing a particularly successful period. Three championship titles in a row? Wow, that team is really in the groove.
See also: groove

stone groove

A cool, groovy thing or experience. Finally being able to see my favorite band live in concert will be a stone groove, man.
See also: groove, stone

stuck in a groove

Seemingly trapped or stuck in a non-changing pattern of life, work, or behavior. Primarily heard in UK. I had so many ambitions when I first graduated from college, but now I feel like I'm stuck in a groove. We're stuck in a groove, Sally—let's move abroad for the summer and shake things up! The touchy relations between the two countries have been stuck in a groove ever since the new president backpedaled on his predecessor's commitments to a new trade deal.
See also: groove, stuck
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

groove on someone or something

to show interest in someone or something; to relate to someone or something. Fred was beginning to groove on new age music when he met Phil. Sam is really grooving on Mary.
See also: groove, on

*in the groove

Sl. attuned to something. (*Typically: be ~; get ~.) I was uncomfortable at first, but now I'm beginning to get in the groove. Fred began to get in the groove, and things went more smoothly.
See also: groove
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in the groove

Performing very well, excellent; also, in fashion, up-to-date. For example, The band was slowly getting in the groove, or To be in the groove this year you'll have to get a fake fur coat. This idiom originally alluded to running accurately in a channel, or groove. It was taken up by jazz musicians in the 1920s and later began to be used more loosely. A variant, back in the groove, means "returning to one's old self," as in He was very ill but now he's back in the groove. [Slang; mid-1800s]
See also: groove
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

in the groove

BRITISH, AMERICAN or

in a groove

AMERICAN
COMMON If someone, especially a sports person or team is in the groove, they are performing well. Nick is in the groove, as he showed with seven goals last weekend. Agassi said: `I was in such a groove, I was able to put the ball exactly where I wanted.' Note: This expression may refer to the way the needle fits neatly into the groove on a record.
See also: groove

stuck in a groove

BRITISH
If you are stuck in a groove, you are doing the same things again and again and no longer feel able to change your habits. After a certain age, it's easy to get stuck in a groove with your style.
See also: groove, stuck
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

in (or into) the groove

1 performing well or confidently, especially in an established pattern. 2 indulging in relaxed and spontaneous enjoyment, especially dancing. informal
A groove is the spiral track cut in a gramophone record that forms the path for the needle. In the groove is first found in the mid 20th century, in the context of jazz, and it gave rise to the adjective groovy , which initially meant ‘playing or able to play jazz or similar music well’.
See also: groove
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

be (stuck) in a ˈgroove

(British English) be unable to change something that you have been doing the same way for a long time and that has become boring: While other businesses are attracting new customers, this one seems to be stuck in a groove, and has been losing money for the last two years.
See also: groove
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

get in the groove

in. to become attuned to something. (see also in the groove.) I was uncomfortable at first, but now I’m beginning to get in the groove.
See also: get, groove

groove

n. something pleasant or cool. (see also in the groove.) This day has been a real groove.

groove on someone/something

in. to show interest in someone or something; to relate to someone or something. Fred was beginning to groove on new age music when he met Phil.
See also: groove, on, someone, something

grooved

(gruvd)
mod. pleased. I am so grooved. I’ll just kick back and meditate.
See also: groove

grooving

mod. enjoying; being cool and laid back. Look at those guys grooving in front of the television set.
See also: groove

in the groove

mod. cool; groovy; pleasant and delightful. (see also get in the groove.) Man, is that combo in the groove tonight!
See also: groove

stone groove

n. something really cool; a fine party or concert. This affair is not what I would call a stone groove. Stone beige, maybe.
See also: groove, stone
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

in the groove

Slang
Performing exceptionally well.
See also: groove
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

in the groove

Hits the mark; in the popular fashion. This seemingly very modern expression actually dates from the mid-nineteenth century, when it referred to running very accurately within a fixed channel, or groove. In the 1930s the term became jazz slang for performing very well and also gave rise to groovy, for splendid. Then it probably alluded to a phonograph needle running in the groove of a recording. In subsequent decades the term began to die out, although pop singer Madonna recorded “Get into the Groove” in the late 1980s.
See also: groove
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
The prevalence, location and confirmation of palate-radicular grooves in maxillary incisors.
The models show that boulders rolling across the surface in the aftermath of the Stickney impact could have created the puzzling patterns of grooves seen on Phobos today.
It can be seen that, when the inner wall of the barrel was equipped with helical grooves, the melt pressure in B2 and B3 was much higher than that in Bl.
Combined with the great variation in crimp groove design, as well as crimp die design, it becomes clear the crimping "station" requires much consideration if really big loads are being built.
where [n.sub.1] = fix|(X tan [theta] - Y)cos [tehta]/[L.sub.g]|, [n.sub.2] = fix|X /[L.sub.g]|, fix is a function returning a value towards the nearest integer, [H.sub.g] = [h.sub.g]/c is the dimensionless groove depth, [S.sub.g] = [s.sub.g]/[w.sub.0] is the dimensionless groove spacing, [W.sub.g] = [w.sub.g] / [w.sub.0] is the dimensionless groove width, and [L.sub.g] = [l.sub.g] / [w.sub.0] is the dimensionless distance between two adjacent grooves.
Where, then, does Roholt's properly philosophical approach to groove lie?
The team argued that, regardless of what happens at the tip, capillary suction is important in drawing nectar up the grooves. The tongue is really a "self-assembling capillary siphon," Bush proposed in 2012 with Wonjung Kim, now at Sogang University in Seoul, South Korea, and collaborators.
The percentage of grooves was lower in the present study.
The palatogingival groove can be found in various locations of the tooth viz.
This ensures precise and reliable centering of the groove every time, says Meusburger.
"It has been specifically designed for the wedge-shaped AGS grooves that deliver high pressure ratings, and can roll a groove on standard wall, large diameter pipe in five to seven minutes.
London, Dec 16 (ANI): Researchers from Seoul National University in Korea have developed a new golf ball with grooves rather than dimples that would prevent the putted ball from going in the wrong direction.
Our grooves looked lovely, but according to our CMM, the sizes were inconsistent from one side of the tool to the other.
The researchers let loose these sticky bacteria into the grooves and encourage them to all move in one direction around the circle.