grin like a Cheshire cat

grin like a Cheshire cat

To smile smugly or mischievously. The term was popularized by the character in Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. I knew he had a prank planned for April Fools' Day when he arrived at work grinning like a Cheshire cat.
See also: cat, Cheshire, grin, like

grin like a Cheshire cat

Smile broadly, especially in a self-satisfied way. For example, John ended the set with a beautiful serve, an ace, and couldn't help grinning like a Cheshire cat . The ultimate origin of this expression, appearing in print since the late 1700s, is disputed, but its most famous exponent was Lewis Carroll, in whose Alice's Adventures in Wonderland the grinning cat gradually vanished from view, with its grin the last part to vanish.
See also: cat, Cheshire, grin, like

grin like a Cheshire cat

have a broad fixed smile on your face.
The Cheshire cat with its broad grin is best known for its appearance (and disappearance) in Lewis Carroll 's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland ( 1865 ), but the expression, which is of uncertain origin, is recorded from the first half of the 19th century.
See also: cat, Cheshire, grin, like

grin like a Cheshire ˈcat

smile widely in a foolish way or as if you are very pleased with yourself: She sat there grinning like a Cheshire cat while we tried to put the tent up.The Cheshire Cat is a character in Lewis Carroll’s story, Alice in Wonderland.
See also: cat, Cheshire, grin, like

grin like a Cheshire cat

To smile broadly. The origin of this expression, which was well known in the eighteenth century, has been lost. Most explanations involve the traditional Cheshire County cheese, sold in the shape of a wheel and, perhaps, once so molded that it resembled a cat’s grinning face. Another theory holds that it refers to a Cheshire forest ranger named Caterling who frightened off poachers with his fierce grin. At any rate, the term has been appearing in print since the late 1700s in the works of such writers as William Thackeray and Charles Lamb, as well as in the work of its most famous exponent, Lewis Carroll.
See also: cat, Cheshire, grin, like
References in periodicals archive ?
Piers Morgan, the "Troomp" sycophant who also jetted in to Davos for an interview with his "old mate," was seen striding through the snowy streets with a grin like a Cheshire cat. There was also the journalist from a US evangelical media outlet who snuck into the "Troomp" entourage, apparently with a mission to ask ridiculous questions.
Instead of making you grin like a Cheshire Cat, it'll leave you whimpering like a whipped whippet, but will still no doubt storm the box office.
He had a grin like a Cheshire cat," the Mirror quoted a source as saying.
In 4WD terms the Murano is pretty wacky, with a distinctive swathe of curved chrome running across the full width of the front that creates a grin like a Cheshire cat.
PRIME Minister Tony Blair may grin like a Cheshire cat but for the press pack who followed him around Merseyside it was no laughing matter.
"She had a grin like a Cheshire cat all over her face and didn't seem to care who saw her.
When he designs a Cheshire cat, he is taking a common but unclear phrase of his time ("Grin like a Cheshire cat" referred either to inn signs in the county of Cheshire depicting a grinning lion or to Cheshire cheeses modeled in the shape of a smiling cat) and turning it into a concrete reality.
When he designs a Cheshire cat, he is taking a common but unclear phrase of his time ("Grin like a Cheshire cat" referred either to inn sings in the county of Cheshire depicting a grinning lion or to Cheshire cheeses modeled in the shape of a smiling cat) and turning it into a concrete reality.