grin and bear it


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grin and bear it

To endure an unpleasant situation while remaining somewhat good-natured. Well, a delayed flight isn't an ideal situation, but we'll just have to grin and bear it.
See also: and, bear, grin

grin and bear it

Fig. to endure something unpleasant in good humor. There is nothing you can do but grin and bear it. I hate having to work for rude people. I guess I have to grin and bear it.
See also: and, bear, grin

grin and bear it

Put up good-humoredly with adversity, with good humor, as in It's no fun being sick for the holidays, but you might as well grin and bear it. Also put as grin and abide in the 19th century, this expression became so well known that Sam Walter Foss (1858-1911) made a pun on it in his poem, "The Firm of Grin and Barrett": "Never yet was any panic Scared the firm of Grin and Barrett."
See also: and, bear, grin

grin and bear it

If you grin and bear it, you accept or tolerate something bad, such as a problem or a pain, because you believe you cannot change it. In the past, a royal trapped in a loveless marriage would have been obliged to grin and bear it. Severe or recurrent abdominal pain should always be checked. Don't just grin and bear it.
See also: and, bear, grin

grin and bear it

suffer pain or misfortune in a stoical manner.
The usual modern sense of grin is less sinister than its earliest senses: when it entered the language it primarily meant ‘an act of showing the teeth’ or ‘a snarl’. From the mid 17th century to the mid 18th century, a grin was generally used in a derogatory way or in unfavourable contrast to a cheerful smile . The sense of grin in grin and bear it retains the earlier associations with showing your teeth in a grimace of pain or anger. Grin and abide is recorded as a proverb in the late 18th century; the modern version dates from the late 19th century.
See also: and, bear, grin

grin and ˈbear it

(informal) (only used as an infinitive and in orders) accept something unpleasant without complaining: If the trip is a disaster, you’ll just have to grin and bear it.
See also: and, bear, grin

grin and bear it

Put up with adversity with good humor. This expression originated as grin and abide. It so appears in Erasmus Darwin’s Zoonomia (1794), “We have a proverb where no help could be had in pain, ‘to grin and abide,’” so it presumably was a well-known saying by then. A few years earlier W. Hickey wrote in his Memoirs (1775), “I recommend you to grin and bear it (an expression used by sailors after a long continuance of bad weather).” It has been a cliché for about a hundred years, well known enough for poet Sam Walter Foss (1858–1911) to pun on it in his The Firm of Grin and Barrett (“Never yet has any panic scared the firm of Grin and Barrett”).
See also: and, bear, grin
References in periodicals archive ?
The Grin And Bear It obstacle course in Coventry's War Memorial Park on June 7 is the nbrainchild of Jane McGaffney (inset), community fundraiser for Zoe's Place in Ash Green
GRIN AND BEAR IT: Charlie Smith of Stratford with some of the teddy bears.
THE Queen had no choice but to grin and bear it when a fan put his arm round her for a photo yesterday.
"There is not much we can do but grin and bear it - but we are not doing much grinning.
Buy yourself some earplugs and grin and bear it every once in a while but, in return, let him know you'd like him to spend some nights at home relaxing and doing what you want to do.
My doctor says I have to grin and bear it. Surely not.
We guess the loser will just have to grin and bear it.
I can't afford to go private so I grin and bear it - while I've got teeth."
FRIENDS star Jennifer Aniston learns how to grin and bear it for a TV documentary.