grieve

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grieve for (someone or something)

To experience intense feelings of sadness or mourning due to a particular loss (often the death of a loved one). It's been years since my mother died, and yet I'm still grieving for her. You need time to grieve for what you lost by growing up in such a dysfunctional household.
See also: grieve

grieve over (someone or something)

To experience intense feelings of sadness or mourning due to a particular loss (often the death of a loved one). It's been years since my mother died, and I'm still grieving over her. I know I need to grieve over the end of our relationship, but I'm just sick of crying. You need time to grieve over what you lost by growing up in such a dysfunctional household.
See also: grieve, over

what the eye doesn't see, the heart doesn't grieve over

Remaining ignorant or uninformed about something means it will not upset, anger, or worry someone. A: "Have you told the boss about this plan?" B: "It's better that he stay in the dark about this. What the eye doesn't see, the heart doesn't grieve." I just hung a picture over the hole in the wall in case the landlord ever comes by—what the heart doesn't see, the heart doesn't grieve.
See also: eye, grieve, heart, over, what
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

grieve for someone or something

to mourn for someone or something. Don't grieve for me. I'm okay. She grieved for her lost chances.
See also: grieve

grieve over someone or something

to lament and pine for someone or something. Now, don't grieve over a lost cat. There is no reason to continue grieving over him.
See also: grieve, over

What the eye doesn't see, the heart doesn't grieve over.

Prov. You cannot be upset by something you do not know about. When Robbie cracked his mother's favorite vase, he simply turned the cracked side toward the wall. "What the eye doesn't see, the heart doesn't grieve over," he thought.
See also: eye, grieve, heart, over, what
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

what the eye doesn't see, the heart doesn't grieve over

if you're unaware of an unpleasant fact or situation you can't be troubled by it. proverb
See also: eye, grieve, heart, over, what
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017
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References in periodicals archive ?
McCabe (2003) critiqued the inadequacy of traditional Western cultural understandings of grief, suggesting that these conceptual understandings may not fully allow the space needed for subjective healing because they assume a paternalistic and accomplishment based starting point that privileges movement over being and disallow the continued influence of the deceased on the grievers' experiences moving forward.
Bereaved pet owners, like other disenfranchised grievers, perceive their disenfranchised grief as insignificant and inappropriate (Attig, 2004).
Jeffreys (2005) has described the counselor's role as being one of an "exquisite witness" to the caregiver's struggle; that is, one who "knows that the grief journey is different for each griever, who understands their cultural background, and knows that the function of the therapist is to support this journey and not control it" (p.
The griever has an opportunity to express herself and, if there is consciousness after death, the departed will know that he is missed.
Earlier this month, Jaclyn talked about her transition from griever to leader in Courageous Kids for her "personal journey" project in McCarty's class.
There may not be obvious expressions of sadness and tears in front of others, but do not assume that the griever is not experiencing pain.
Several papers provide empirical evidence that investors prefer stocks that are "closer"--with closeness measured not only by geographic distance, but also by "connectivity" through telephone traffic, tourism, language, immigration, common newspapers and journals (Portes, Rey, and Oh 2001; Daude and Fratzscher 2006; and Ahearne, Griever, and Warnock 2004).
This man has come to Washington to try to move on from grief and will now immerse himself in the letters of that city's most tragic and extravagant griever, a lady who had already lost two sons before her husband was killed, who had lost numerous beloved Southern kinfolk to the Civil War but was obliged to pretend she didn't care, who after the assassination lay prostrate in the White House for six weeks while the band played on, who lived the rest of her life dressed in costly widow's weeds.
They also suggest that the large asymmetry of information on domestic and international stocks makes investors' reluctance to invest abroad appear rational (Ahearne, Griever, and Warnock 2004).
I'm not a serial griever -- I'll reserve grief for my family and loved ones -- but I did feel a tangible sense of loss on hearing the news.
The griever, with her ability to create a narrative and find listeners, "has the capacity to change the narrative and thus change his or her life" (140).
Though reaction to bereavement varies from child to child and by gender, the death of a parent or other loved one can bring many changes into the life of the griever.
The only human feeling besides lust for power and revenge that flourishes in such a world is grief, which burns brightly for moments until the griever is extinguished in turn.
The impact of bereavement varies widely, depending on the characteristics of the griever and the nature of the loss.