grief


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get (a lot of) grief (from someone)

To receive strong criticism, disapproval, or judgment (for something). I got a lot of grief from my parents over my decision to pursue a degree in art rather than law or medicine. I'm going to get grief from my boss for that accounting error I made last week. John stills gets a lot of grief for that time his pants fell down in the middle of class.
See also: get, grief, lot

give (one) grief

To criticize or tease someone. Once my brother hears that I hit a parked car, he'll give me grief about it for years to come. I'm pretty sure that Kevin likes Katie, so I keep giving him grief about it.
See also: give, grief

come to grief

To fail or otherwise suffer a problem or setback. The project came to grief after we lost our funding.
See also: come, grief

good grief

An expression of surprise or frustration. Oh, good grief—my car won't start again.
See also: good, grief

come to grief

Fig. to experience something unpleasant or damaging. In the end, he came to grief because he did not follow instructions.
See also: come, grief

Good grief!

Inf. an exclamation of surprise, shock, or amazement. Alice: Good grief! I'm late! Mary: That clock's fast. You're probably okay on time. Bill: There are seven newborn kittens under the sofa! Jane: Good grief!
See also: good

come to grief

Meet with disaster or failure. For example, The icy runway caused at least one light plane to come to grief. [Mid-1800s]
See also: come, grief

good grief

An exclamation expressing surprise, alarm, dismay, or some other, usually negative emotion. For example, Good grief! You're not going to start all over again, or Good grief! He's dropped the cake. The term is a euphemism for "good God." [Early 1900s]
See also: good, grief

come to grief

have an accident; meet with disaster.
2000 R. W. Holden Taunton Cider & Langdons The historian…will see no trace of the battlefield where Charles's grandson, the Duke of Monmouth, came to grief.
See also: come, grief

give someone grief

be a nuisance to someone. informal
1998 Times One of the passengers who'd been giving the cabin crew grief started yelling, ‘We've had a near miss.’
See also: give, grief, someone

come to ˈgrief

(informal) be destroyed or ruined; have an accident and hurt yourself: His plans came to grief due to poor organization and insufficient financing.A lot of ships have come to grief along this coast.
See also: come, grief

give somebody ˈgrief (about/over something)

(informal) be annoyed with somebody and criticize their behaviour: Stop giving me grief and let me finish this!
See also: give, grief, somebody

good ˈgrief!

(informal) used for expressing surprise or disbelief: Good grief! You’re not going out dressed like that, are you?
See also: good

come to grief

To meet with disaster; fail.
See also: come, grief
References in periodicals archive ?
Also, Chief Minister Shehbaz Sharif expressed grief and sorrow over the loss of lives in crash of a passenger plane in Iran.
In his condolence message, the chief minister said we stand with the people of Iran during this hour of grief and we wholeheartedly share the sorrow of the bereaved families.
We have responded to the demand by broadening the application parameters and increasing the financial support so that even more grief service providers can reach diverse and disadvantaged youth across the country.
Chief of Army Staff, General Qamar Javed Bajwa and Chief of Joint Staff General Zubair Mehmood Hayat expressed their grief on sad demise of ex Air Chief, Air Marshal Asghar Khan, Retired.
Meanwhile, Punjab Chief Minister Shahbaz Sharif has expressed deep sense of grief over the death of labourers due to electrocution in Sunder area of Lahore.
If you've already experienced grief, you will be aware of the different emotions associated with loss.
Part 1 outlines theory of grief and attachment, complicated grief, the role of culture and community, and treatment concepts.
Her psychotherapeutic mechanism-of-action study identified two other mediators of improvement in response to complicated grief treatment (CGT): guilt related to the death and negative thoughts about the future.
But grief is a subject that still feels awkward, uncomfortable and even slightly taboo.
It does not dismiss grief or offer useless platitudes.
For most individuals, grief symptoms attenuate naturally over a period of time (Shear et al.
DEALING WITH YOUR UNSPOKEN GRIEF isn't just about death; it's about loss.
WITH DR ELLIE MILBY DEALING WITH YOUR UNSPOKEN GRIEF isn't just about death; it's about loss.
Complicated Grief Treatment: Psychotherapy Better than Antidepressant.
I appreciate Katherine Ozment's sharing about her care through secular grief outreach.