graze on (something)

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graze on (something)

1. Of animals, to eat the greens or vegetables in a particular area or location. I put up a fence to try to keep the deer from grazing on my land.
2. Of animals, to eat something in particular. I put up a fence to try to keep the deer from grazing on the vegetables in my garden.
3. Of people, to eat small amounts of food over a period of time, usually instead of full meals. I've been grazing on snacks all day, so I'm not very hungry right now.
4. Of people, to eat a variety of foods in small quantities at one time, instead of a full meal. I'm not too hungry, I think I'll just graze on some snacks at the party.
See also: graze, on
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

graze on something

 
1. [for animals] to browse or forage in a particular location. The cattle are grazing on the neighbor's land. I wish they wouldn't graze on other people's land.
2. [for animals] to browse or forage, eating something in particular. The deer are grazing on my carrots! The cows were grazing on the meadow grasses for weeks.
See also: graze, on
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In 1987, the BLM declared a moratorium on nearly all cattle grazing on its San Pedro River allotments.
However, the good news is livestock grazing on public lands in the West is gaining recognition as an important issue, due to regional organizations such as Western Watersheds Project, based in Hailey, Idaho, and national organizations such as the Sierra Club.
The court said (in a 33-page opinion) that my vested water rights for livestock grazing on my allotments were compensable property rights under the Fifth Amendment of the U.S.
District Court in Northern California, had failed to follow through on its promise to stop cattle grazing on lands essential to the survival of the threatened desert tortoise.
Patterson began receiving reports of continued grazing on the disputed lands.
But private livestock grazing on public lands illustrates best the dismal environmental legacy of Progressive conservation.