gravitate to(ward) (someone or something)

(redirected from gravitate to one)

gravitate to(ward) (someone or something)

To tend to move toward or show interest in some person, place, or thing, as if being pulled by a magnetic force. Teenagers always seem to gravitate to rebellious behavior—it's not something that's unique to your son. I just gravitate toward those kinds of artsy movies, I can't help it. The kids always seem to gravitate to Aunt Joan whenever the whole family gets together.
See also: gravitate

gravitate to(ward) someone or something

Fig. to move slowly toward someone or something, as if being pulled by gravity. People tend to gravitate toward the kitchen at parties. Unless you correct their manners, the children will gravitate toward rude behavior.
See also: gravitate
References in periodicals archive ?
Some guests may gravitate to one over others, while other guests may choose to sample all three varieties.
They should discover that there are only twenty that survive and when the process is repeated they all gravitate to one answer.
Tourists in Phnom Penh tend to gravitate to one of the more macabre sites in Southeast Asia.
However, the shipper will need to see value in this change, or else he or she will gravitate to one of the LTL carrier holdouts that can be counted on to buck the new system, say analysts.
Many clients will immediately gravitate to one carrier.
Certainly these categories of individuals, university-types, are easily recognized on any campus, and warrant study to find out why some gravitate to one category rather than another.
Sometimes, it is frustrating, but I think it's natural for people to gravitate to one member of the band and single them out."
Warning flags should go up when agency personnel only seem to gravitate to one or two carriers and a too short an array of products.
They do not intentionally exclude non-Koreans from their ministries, Kim notes, but they gravitate to one another because they have such similar life experiences.
This buddy does not have to be formally introduced as a "buddy" or friend, the company can establish a culture whereby existing staff take the initiative to know the newcomer, and allow people with common interests or background to gravitate to one another.
But for whatever reason, the vast majority of men seem to gravitate to one end of the spectrum or the other.
Most runners gravitate to one or two events and never explore other possibilities.
Looking at a group of five canvases, people will often gravitate to one or two of them.
Friends did not gravitate to one another based just on similar personalities, Funder found.