grape

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Related to grapey: grapy

through the grapevine

Through or via an informal means of communication or information, especially gossip. There is always some absurd rumor or piece of misinformation through the grapevine at work, but I try to just tune most of that out. I heard through the grapevine that John is planning to propose to Samantha next week!
See also: grapevine, through

on the grapevine

Through or via an informal means of communication or information, especially gossip. There is always some absurd rumor or piece of misinformation on the grapevine at work, but I try to just tune most of that out. I heard on the grapevine that John is planning to propose to Samantha next week!
See also: grapevine, on

belt the grape

To get drunk, especially on wine. Based on all the empty wine bottles, I'm guessing you guys really belted the grape last night.
See also: belt, grape

sour grapes

Criticism or disparagement of that which one cannot have. The phrase originated in one of Aesop's fables, in which a fox that cannot reach some grapes deems them sour and therefore undesirable. He always mocks sports cars as being really impractical, but it's just sour grapes, if you ask me.
See also: grape, sour

African golf ball

offensive slang A watermelon. A reference to the stereotype of black people having an affinity for watermelon. (As former African-American slaves grew and sold watermelons following the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863, the fruit became representative of their freedom and was then used as a demeaning stereotype by whites who opposed that freedom.)
See also: African, ball, golf

African grape

offensive slang A watermelon. A reference to the stereotype of black people having an affinity for watermelon. (As former African-American slaves grew and sold watermelons following the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863, the fruit became representative of their freedom and was then used as a demeaning stereotype by whites who opposed that freedom.)
See also: African, grape

grape smugglers

slang A very skimpy male bikini. I can't believe Albert insists on wearing grape smugglers to the beach—how embarrassing!
See also: grape

grape-shot

slang Drunk. Do you remember last night at the bar at all? You were really grape-shot!

the grape(s)

slang Wine. I must have had a little too much of the grape last night because I ended up falling asleep on the couch.

belt the grape

Sl. to drink wine or liquor heavily and become intoxicated. He has a tendency to belt the grape—every afternoon after work. She's been belting the grape more than her husband wants.
See also: belt, grape

sour grapes

Fig. something that one cannot have and so disparages as if it were never desirable. of course you want to buy this expensive jacket. Criticizing it is just sour grapes, but you still really want it.
See also: grape, sour

sour grapes

Disparaging what one cannot obtain, as in The losers' scorn for the award is pure sour grapes. This expression alludes to the Greek writer Aesop's famous fable about a fox that cannot reach some grapes on a high vine and announces that they are sour. In English the fable was first recorded in William Caxton's 1484 translation, "The fox said these raisins be sour."
See also: grape, sour

sour grapes

COMMON If you describe someone's attitude as sour grapes, you mean that they are jealous of another person's success and show this jealousy by criticizing that person. These accusations have been going on for some time now, but it is just sour grapes. The government says that Mr Fedorov's criticisms are mere sour grapes. Note: In one of Aesop's fables (= traditional stories, usually with a moral), a fox tries several times unsuccessfully to reach a bunch of delicious-looking grapes. In the end he gives up, telling himself that they are probably sour and inedible anyway.
See also: grape, sour

sour grapes

an attitude in which someone disparages or pretends to despise something because they cannot have it themselves.
In Aesop's fable The Fox and the Grapes, the fox, unable to reach the tempting bunch of grapes, comforts himself with the thought that they were probably sour anyway.
1998 New Scientist At 66, I can be acquitted of any sour grapes, but I feel sorry for younger MPs…[who] have all been passed over.
See also: grape, sour

sour ˈgrapes

(saying) used to describe the behaviour of somebody who pretends that something they cannot have is of little value or interest: When she failed the entrance exam, she started saying that she never wanted to go to college anyway, but I think that’s just sour grapes.This idiom comes from one of Aesop’s fables. A fox cannot reach some grapes so he decides that they are not ready to eat.
See also: grape, sour

African golf ball

and African grape
n. a watermelon. (Alludes to an early stereotype of Americans of African descent being very fond of watermelon. Forced, contrived, and demeaning.) When he said we were having African grapes for dessert, I though he meant sherbet. Look at the size of that African golf ball!
See also: African, ball, golf

African grape

verb
See also: African, grape

belt the grape

tv. to drink wine or liquor heavily and become intoxicated. He has a tendency to belt the grape—twenty-four hours a day.
See also: belt, grape

grape shot

mod. alcohol intoxicated; drunk on wine. After the reception, Hank found himself a little grape shot.
See also: grape, shot

grape smugglers

n. tight swimming briefs. (As if the wearer had stuffed some grapes into the crotch in order to smuggle them somewhere.) He owned a pair of grape smugglers, but never wore them in public.
See also: grape

grape(s)

n. champagne; wine. (see also berries.) No more of the grapes for me. It tickles my nose.
See also: grape

grape

verb
See grapes

grapes of wrath

n. wine. Fred had taken a little too much of the grapes of wrath.
See also: grape, of, wrath

in the grip of the grape

mod. drunk on wine; drunk. Wayne was in the grip of the grape and couldn’t talk straight.
See also: grape, grip, of

sour grapes

Disparaging what one cannot but would like to have. This term comes from the punch line of one of Aesop’s most famous fables, delivered by the fox when she finds she cannot reach some grapes on a very high vine. It has been used ever since to describe putting down what one can’t attain.
See also: grape, sour
References in periodicals archive ?
This setup, sans a convincing motive, is permanently damaging to what could have been an amusing and ironic family saga, and every opportunity along the way for physical comedy (Bob, for instance, proving a total klutz on the clan's apple-harvesting machine) or dramatic conflict is deflated by a combo of Grapey's unpleasant mugging, Tristan's tin ear for dialogue and Hancock's jittery pacing and staging.
But Famous Door stayed together, even after co-founder Grapey (still an ensemble member) relocated to Los Angeles.
DELIGHTFULLY grapey, very sweet, semi-sparkling wine made from the Muscat (Moscato) grape - the only variety that produces a wine that really does taste of grapes.
SOMERFIELD PRINCE WILLIAM RESERVE BRUT, pounds 12.95 Light and fluffy with a lemony bouquet and a pleasant grapey taste.
This fabulous, grapey, raisiny, baked-apple treat, has just enough acidity to be refreshing and is stunning with cheese.
Blind Spot Riesling, 2012, Clare Valley (PS7.50, 12%) is delicate, dry, fresh, grapey and lapping in lime cordial.
And to compound it, I then had to get the courtesy bus back to my car (which the law decrees must be parked on the borders of Hereford) along with lots of braying tall people (reading sure adds those inches!), who had called their offspring names like Peregrine and Maud, and who wouldn't stop blathering about Lemony bloody Snicket, and some flavour of the month memoirist, and about how jolly erudite and damned eloquent some other famous bloke was, which all made me very irritable and sour grapey indeed.
Surprisingly, if all else fails, you could resort to Asti Spumante, where the lightness and sweet grapey flavours make a pleasing contrast to the weight of the chocolate.
Somerfield's Asti Capetta (pounds 4.99)is full of delicate, grapey and flowery bubbles.
Kick that wine snobbery into touch and just enjoy the kick of Italy's bubbly, grapey hit.
Muscat: A grape variety that comes in many guises, sometimes dry, more often sweet but always aromatic and "grapey" in flavour.
This gives a pleasant grip and quite a long, grapey finish.
Refreshing and ready to drink now, here are some top picks to pour under shimmering blue skies A floral and grapey muscat that's laced with a mild sweetness, Torres Days of Summer 2013, Chile (PS5.99 from PS6.99, now until August 26, The Co-op) is deliciously juicy and exuberant with honeysuckle notes and a lovely lift of yellow apples and lemon on the gentle finish.
It's a sweet hit of something grapey with hints of peach.
Ruby is the youngest and cheapest - sweet, grapey and a bit raw.