grandstand

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grandstand play

1. In sports, any excessively showy action or maneuver during play done primarily to impress or entertain the spectators. Originally specific to baseball, it has since been extended to any sport. Rather than shoot the ball and secure an easy two points for the team, she instead attempted to slam dunk the ball as a grandstand play for the crowd.
2. By extension, any excessively dramatic, showy, or ostentatious action, behavior, or maneuver. Our manager is more concerned with making a grandstand play for the CEO than effectively running the office. The dictator's constant threats of war are more of a grandstand play than a legitimate concern to the rest of the world.
See also: grandstand, play

make a grandstand play

1. In sports, to perform any excessively showy action or maneuver during play so as to impress or entertain the spectators. Originally specific to baseball, it has since been extended to any sport. Rather than shoot the ball and secure an easy two points for the team, she decided instead to make a grandstand play by trying for a slam dunk.
2. By extension, to act or behave in an excessively dramatic, showy, or ostentatious manner; to show off. Our manager is more concerned with making a grandstand play for the CEO than effectively running the office.
See also: grandstand, make, play

grandstand play, make a

Show off, act ostentatiously, as in His colleagues were annoyed with Tom for constantly making a grandstand play at sales conferences . This expression was first used for a baseball play made to impress the crowd in the grandstand (the section of high-priced seats at ballparks). [Second half of 1800s] For a synonym, see play to the gallery.
See also: grandstand, make

grandstand

in. to make oneself conspicuous. Don’t you just hate the way that Pat grandstands all the time?

grandstand play

n. something done exceedingly well to impress an audience or a group of spectators. The grandstand play caught the attention of the crowd just as they were leaving.
See also: grandstand, play

grandstand play

An ostentatious action; behavior designed to attract maximum attention. The term comes from nineteenth-century American baseball, where certain players deliberately sought the attention and favor of the spectators in the grandstands. It appeared in one of W. K. Post’s Harvard Stories of 1893: “They all hold on to something. . . . To faint or fall over would be a grand-stand play.”
See also: grandstand, play
References in periodicals archive ?
He's a grandstander. The FBI has been in turmoil," Trump told NBC News in his first interview since firing Comey.
Along the way, without ever stopping to say so, he demolishes Horgan's thesis and reveals Horgan for the rash grandstander many scientists already thought him to be.
The scientist of intelligence we have described is not a natural grandstander; Jensen's detailed critique of Gould's well-known Mismeasure of Man was published in a relatively obscure outlet.
He denounces corporate special interests and Boschwitz's cozy relationship with them, yet he spends much time asserting that he is not an ideological grandstander but a senator who actually gets things done.
attorney in Los Angeles during the Johnson administration, is also a grandstander.
Abby's owner Rob Mondi went in on The Grandstander project with Reyes, putting an emphasis on barbecue as a menu staple, and bringing the game of darts back to the area.
Trump fired the FBI chief on May 9, setting off a political firestorm, and he has since called Comey a "showboat" and a "grandstander."
Donald Trump suggesting that FBI Director James Comey was a showboat and a grandstander is so like the pot calling the kettle black.
The revelation came as Trump opened up a bitter war of words with the ousted intelligence boss, labelling him a "showboat" and "grandstander".
Here's what they don't need: A grandstander, a blowhard, an attention seeker.
Now Waite, the old grandstander, has fetched up in Beirut's southern suburbs to "help his personal reconciliation because the past is in the past".
Many Giuliani watchers already understand that Rudy is a hothead and a grandstander, even a bit of a dictator at times.
'David Blunkett is the biggest grandstander in government,' she said.
Viewers found out from the seaQuest's captain that Deon had "been a grandstander since he sold IBM off in a yard sale when he was 23." Lucas, another "seaQuest" hero, stated that Deon "is a privateer, and his companies are turning the world's water supplies into sewage." Responding to Lucas, one of Deon's employees, said: "Well, our stock options have increased 1,700% in the last six months." Lucas replied, "Well, it's going to be pretty hard to drink stock options when the planet runs out of clean water, right?"
The same memo, prophetically entitled "The Timing, if any (emphasis added), in the Provision of Services Under a National Health Insurance Plan", advocated that, if push comes to shove and only one service can be initially enacted, physician services should be the first to be put into place.(7) Congressional Hearings The tenor of the heatings on the various bills submitted by the Administration during the Truman period reveals the impact of the Cold War.(8) Senator Robert Taft described the Wagner-Murray-Dingell bill as the "most socialistic measure that this Congress has ever had before it." In return, Senator Murray accused Taft of being a liar, a grandstander, impertinent, and insulting.