grandfather

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(one) could be (someone's) (parent/grandparent)

One is old enough to be someone else's parent or grandparent. Used in reference to two people who are or may become romantic or sexual partners, especially to indicate that the speaker thinks such a pairing would be inappropriate. He's going out with Mary from the legal department? But she could be his mother! I don't feel comfortable with this. I could be your grandfather, for heaven's sake!
See also: could

(one) is old enough to be (someone's) (parent/grandparent)

One is old enough to be someone else's parent or grandparent. Used in reference to two people who are or may become romantic or sexual partners, especially to indicate that the speaker thinks such a pairing would be inappropriate. He's going out with Mary from the legal department? But she's old enough to be his mother! I don't feel comfortable with this. I'm old enough to be your grandfather, for heaven's sake!
See also: enough, old

grandfather (someone or something)

To exempt certain people or things from new limitations or restrictions, thus allowing them to continue doing or benefiting from something as they did before. This can be done through the use of a "grandfather clause." If they change the pension plan, they better grandfather us!
See also: grandfather

grandfather clause

A clause that exempts certain people or businesses from new limitations or restrictions, thus allowing them to continue doing or benefiting from something as they did before. Originally referred to a clause added to the constitutions of some Southern US states that exempted people with relatives that had voted before 1867 from strict new voting requirements, in effect disproportionately limiting the ability of African Americans to vote. No, I still get to pay the reduced rate, thanks to a grandfather clause in my contract.
See also: clause, grandfather

grandfather in

To exempt certain people or businesses from new limitations or restrictions, thus allowing them to continue doing or benefiting from something as they did before. This can be done through the use of a "grandfather clause." A noun or pronoun can be used between "grandfather" and "in." If they change the pension plan, they better grandfather us in!
See also: grandfather
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

(a) grandfather clause

a clause in an agreement that protects certain rights granted in the past even when conditions change in the future. The contract contained a grandfather clause that protected my pension payments against claims such as might arise from a future lawsuit.
See also: clause, grandfather

grandfather someone or something in

to protect someone or a right through the use of a grandfather clause. My payments were grandfathered in years ago.
See also: grandfather
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
But, if an individual changes carriers and buys a similar policy, the new policy will still lose grandfathered status, officials say.
if an employer enters into a new policy, certificate or contract of insurance after March 23, 2010, then that new policy, certificate or contract of insurance is not a grandfathered plan with respect to individuals in the group health plan.
For example, if a plan increases, from to 20% to 21%, the percentage of co-insurance a participant must pay for out-of-network coverage, the plan will lose its grandfathered status;
Two final notes: 1) Employers who made a plan change between March 23 and June 14 can return to their previous plan and remain grandfathered. 2) The credit for the title of this month's column belongs to my company's president, Craig Keohan.
Plans can maintain their grandfathered status as long as they do not significantly reduce benefits, raise co-payments or deductibles more than the rate of medical inflation plus 15 percent, switch insurers, add or tighten annual limits, or lower employer contributions by 5 or more percent.
Additionally, grandfathered plans are allowed to add new benefits or beneficiaries, make modest adjustments to existing benefits, voluntarily adopt new consumer protections, or make changes to comply with state or other federal laws.
If a change to a trust is desired, taxpayers want to be certain that the anticipated revision will not taint the trust's grandfathered status.
These regulations provide guidance on the types of modifications, constructions and settlement of controversies that can be freely made to an exempt trust by a trustee, without endangering the trust's grandfathered status and without prior IRS authorization or approval.
PPACA exempts grandfathered plans from some PPACA coverage requirements.
From grandfathered plans, the Labor Department is asking for copies of grandfathered status disclosure documents and documents showing that the plans qualify for grandfathered status, the compliance specialists say.
The repeal of the 15% excess distributions tax alleviates the need to be concerned about excess distributions or to keep track of unrecovered grandfathered amounts.
For small nonprofit organizations without a grandfathered Sec.
Making the grandfather election does not eliminate the potential excise tax, since the grandfathered amount is included to determine if the excise tax applies.
Therefore, taxpayers contemplating an exchange of an older insurance or annuity contract should consider the possible loss of grandfathered benefits before such an exchange.
Considering the multitude of debt workouts in recent months, companies with "grandfathered" debt obligations are well-advised to pay special attention to any modifications that may jeopardize their preferred status.