graduate from

graduate from (something)

1. To complete one's studies in a particular school or program. I can't believe we're about to graduate from college—how did four years go by that quickly? I graduate from my doctoral program in May.
2. To advance to a higher rank. At the end of the summer, I'll graduate from being a junior counselor to being a regular camp counselor.
See also: graduate

graduate from

v.
1. To move up from one position, rank, or level, to a higher one: That year, the athletes graduated from amateur to professional status in the competition.
2. To complete the academic requirements of some institution, usually receiving an academic degree: I graduated from college with a degree in history.
See also: graduate
References in periodicals archive ?
Paid house jobs should be provided to graduates just like students who graduate from Pakistan.
Even as an increasing percentage of black Americans graduate from college -- often, the first in their family to do so -- they remain more likely to need to borrow to finance their undergraduate education, and the borrowing gap between the races has stayed, in percentage-point terms, about as wide for 2000-2014 graduates as in earlier decades.
A new study showed that of the 94 million Chinese who have graduated or will graduate from college from 2010 to 2020, more than half will have to take blue-collar jobs, owing to an oversupply of college graduates in China.
According to the report, an average of 9.4 million students will graduate from college each year in 2010-2020.
Every year over 300,000 students graduate from higher education institutions in the UK.
Many students graduate from teacher education programs without the skills and knowledge to become effective teachers.
* Every single 02 graduate from the B-52 course deployed--to mission planning cells, the Combined Air Operations Center (CAOC) and as combat fliers.
Critically, reform efforts have done little to improve the rate at which students graduate from a regular high school program by the typical age of 18 years.
When one considers that this rate is annual and accounts for students through age 24, one can see how misleading such a statistic can become when trying to develop responsive policies that rely on predictions of how many eighth graders are likely to graduate from a typical high school four years later.
Students graduate from their programs full of book knowledge, inadequate intervention skills, and a lack of experience about the diverse worldviews and real life problems of ethnic and racial minority groups (Ponterotto & Casas, 1991).
This gives us an estimate of the annual graduation rate--the percentage of each class of schoolchildren that goes on to graduate from high school.
Another explanation for falling graduation rates may be the increasing reliance on high-stakes exit exams to determine whether students can graduate from high school with a standard diploma.
By 2000, 12% more students will graduate from high schools than do today and those numbers will continue to grow well into the 21st century.
The number of people who graduate from college each year is a major part of the total number of entrants to the college job market.
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