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above (one's) pay grade

1. The responsibility of those who are of a higher authority than oneself, denoted by the level of pay that one receives in comparison to one's superiors. All these questions you're asking are above your pay grade. He had some great ideas about how to run the company, but contributing such things was above his pay grade.
2. Above or beyond one's general skill, knowledge, ability, or willingness to participate. He soon realized that the details of the IT development project were a bit above his pay grade. Sorry, fishing garbage out of the lake is above my pay grade.
See also: above, grade, pay

at grade

On the same level. Typically said of streets and railroad tracks. A: "Is the train station up on the hill? Because I don't know that I can make it all the way up there!" B: "No, don't worry, the station is at grade with the street."
See also: grade

beyond (one's) pay grade

1. The responsibility of those who are of a higher authority than oneself, denoted by the level of pay which one receives in comparison to one's superiors. All these questions you're asking are beyond your pay grade. He had some great ideas about how to run the company, but contributing such things was beyond his pay grade.
2. Above or beyond one's skill, knowledge, ability, or willingness to participate. He soon realized that the details of the IT development project were a bit beyond his pay grade. Sorry, fishing garbage out of the lake is beyond my pay grade.
See also: beyond, grade, pay

grade down

To give someone a low grade or score on something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "grade" and "down." I'll grade down anyone who hands in a sloppy book report. I hope the teacher grades Joey down for talking during my presentation.
See also: down, grade

grade-grubber

1. A student who is intently and primarily focused on getting good grades. I know some of the kids in my class are just grade-grubbers—anxious to get an A above all else.
2. A student who tries to persuade the teacher to change their grade, as through flattery or questioning. He only complimented your outfit because he's a grade-grubber who wants you to turn his B into an A. All the grade-grubbers are saying that I misled them with how I worded one of the questions on the test, ugh.

grade-grubbing

1. noun Of a student, the act of working intently, and primarily, on getting good grades. I know some of the kids in my class are grade-grubbing and only want to get an A above all else.
2. noun The act of trying to persuade a teacher to change one's grade, as through flattery or questioning. All the grade-grubbing needs to stop—that question is not misleading, and I'm not changing any of your grades.
3. adjective Describing a student who is solely focused on getting good grades. You're bound to get a few grade-grubbing students who just want an A and don't really care about the material.

make the grade

To satisfy a certain standard; to succeed. He submitted some writing samples, but I'm not quite sure these make the grade. I was unsure about being able to make the grade as a salesperson, but my numbers speak for themselves now.
See also: grade, make

up to grade

Meeting a necessary standard. I don't think this product is up to grade—it shouldn't break down this quickly.
See also: grade, up

grade someone down (on something)

to give someone a low ranking, rating, or score on some performance. I had to grade you down on your essay because of your spelling. Please don't grade me down for a minor mistake.
See also: down, grade

make the grade

to be satisfactory; to be what is expected. I'm sorry, but your work doesn't exactly make the grade. This meal doesn't just make the grade. It is excellent.
See also: grade, make

make the grade

Satisfy the requirements, qualify; also, succeed. For example, Angela hoped her work in the new school would make the grade, or Barbara certainly has made the grade as a trial lawyer. This expression uses grade in the sense of "accepted standard." [c. 1900]
See also: grade, make

make the grade

COMMON If you make the grade, you succeed at something, usually by reaching a particular standard. As a child, she wanted to be a dancer but failed to make the grade. Top public schools have failed to make the grade in a recently published league table of academic results. Note: In American English, a `grade' is a slope. This expression was originally used in connection with United States railways to refer to a train which succeeded in climbing a steep section of track.
See also: grade, make

make the grade

succeed; reach the desired standard. informal
See also: grade, make

make the ˈgrade

(informal) reach a high enough standard in an exam, a job, etc: You’ll never make the grade if you don’t work hard before the exams.Do you think she’ll ever make the grade as a journalist?
See also: grade, make

grade down

v.
To give someone a lower rank or score, usually with respect to something evaluated: The teacher graded me down on my English test because of my terrible penmanship. The driving instructor graded down our group because we weren't listening.
See also: down, grade

grade-grubber

1. n. an earnest, hardworking student. (In the way a pig roots or grubs around for food.) If there are too many grade-grubbers in a class, it will really throw off the grading scale.
2. n. a student who flatters the teacher in hopes of a higher grade. A few grade-grubbers help assure old professors that the world is not really changing at all.

grade-grubbing

1. n. working hard at one’s studies in hopes of a high grade. If all you’re here for is grade-grubbing, you’re going to miss a lot.
2. n. flattering a teacher in hopes of a higher grade. Some teachers don’t mind a lot of grade-grubbing.
3. mod. having to do with students who are only concerned with getting high grades. Two grade-grubbing seniors came in and begged me to change their grades.

make the grade

To measure up to a given standard.
See also: grade, make

make the grade, to

To reach a given standard or pass a test. This term apparently alludes to climbing a steep hill or gradient and was transferred to mean any kind of success in the first half of the twentieth century. An early appearance in print is in S. Ford’s Inez and Trilby (1921): “Three days! I doubt if she can make the grade.”
See also: make
References in periodicals archive ?
" Molly Chesters, who achieved a grade 9, two grade 8s, four grade 7s and three grade 6s said: e hard work and dedication eventually pays o."Ben Edelman was delighted with his results, a grade 8, four grade 7s and four grade 6s, and will return to Cardinal Langley to study economics, politics and maths.
At Al Ain Academy, 89 per cent achieved five 9-4 grades, while 84 per cent of them achieved five 9-4 grades including English and Maths.
Some studies have reported no significant difference in either the RPFS between Simpson grade I, II and III resections, or between RPFS for gross resection compared to subtotal resection, suggesting that grade II (and in some cases grade III) resection may be as beneficial as grade I resection.
NEWPORT: Reported a 97.9% provisional pass rate of A*-G, with an improvement of 1.6% on higher grades, at 64.2%.
The sample for this study consisted of 3707 urban public school students who participated in the NELS:88 first (10th grade) and second (12th grade) follow-up surveys.
MATHE: Conversion to higher value grades is becoming a common occurrence and challenge for paper mills.
8 news (a much cleaner grade of old newspaper)," one mill buyer says.
Correlation between student satisfaction and grades: A case of mistaken causation?
Overall, the prevalence of having rarely or never worn seat belts was higher among male (21.5%) than female (14.6%) students; higher among black male (25.6%) than black female (15.6%) students; and higher among 10th grade male (20.4%) and 12th grade male (21.1%) than 10th grade female (13.3%) and 12th grade female (10.9%) students, respectively.
BASF has also brought out three new flame-retardant grades. Ultramid B3U HF is a halogen-free, unreinforced nylon 6 for thin-wall electrical housings that require a UL 94V-0 rating.
Consistent talks, study time and organizational skill have been directly linked to consistently good grades.
At the end of seventh grade, the psychosocial model revealed three significant predictors of sexual initiation: Adolescents' odds of having had sex at this stage decreased as their own beliefs, or their perceptions of friends' beliefs, that one should refrain from sexual intercourse increased (odds ratio, 0.7), and as perceived self-efficacy in using condoms and refusing sex increased (0.8).
In reading scores, two of the four within-cohort comparisons reveal a widening of the black-white gap as children move through school: between the 1st and 2nd grades, the gap grew one-third of a standard deviation larger, and another one-fifth of a standard deviation larger between grades 3 and 5.