goy

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goy

Someone who is not Jewish. The word comes from Yiddish and is typically used by Jewish people. It can have a negative or disparaging connotation. He's clearly a goy, so why would he know the local synagogue's schedule?

goy

(goɪ)
1. n. a gentile. (From Hebrew. Not necessarily derogatory.) But the goys can’t do anything they want on Sunday!
2. mod. gentile; non-Jewish. Goy pickles are sort of blah.
References in periodicals archive ?
Anna and Sophie take turns grilling the amiable, and very goyish, Jimmy Constant (Kevin Isola), and are delighted and outraged, respectively, at his confession that he and Miri have agreed to marry and move to Southern California.
In a wry pastiche of traditional exegesis, Amichai takes on the rabbinic anxiety about nature as alien, goyish, a seduction.
What seems most to have rankled Yiddish-speaking comrades was Hillman's dogged desire to promote himself among the goyish sheyne (beautiful gentiles) of national power.
Is there anything more goyish than New Year's resolutions?
If you live in Butte, Montana, you're going to be goyish even if you're Jewish."
In his now classic routine, "Jewish and Goyish," Lenny Bruce does the ultimate job of drawing distinctions:
At least, till I got older, out of the city to a college in the Midwest, and into the goyish world at large!
Staub opens his impressive edited collection of primary sources, The Jewish 1960s, by asserting, "If the 1851s were goyish (and they were), then the 1960s were very Jewish.
As the soigne cosmopolitan Uber-Jewess shrink, however, Babs ultimately cannot compete with Nolte's goyish connection to his native soil.
Ever since Matthew Weiner and his Mad Men said shalom to the small screen, TV, it seems, has become a starkly goyish affair: From I Can Do That, where celebrities compete against one another with newly acquired talents like juggling or doing a jig, to American Ninja Warrior's extreme feats of acrobatics, the summer's top shows are all about mindless, physical fun, three words seldom associated with Jews.
As David Sax describes it, the Reuben is "so goyish it's practically kosher."
"That's a toughy!" How can a yeke, a super-punctilious German Jew, a scholar in a three-piece suit, be "exactly the same" as a goyish American drifter who is squandering his father's inheritance?
How could they possibly think that he should shlep the goyish icons through the streets of Havana?
If you live in Butte, Montana, you're going to be goyish even if you're Jewish." You could say almost the same thing about Seattle in those days.
They are also aware of the costs of all that goyish normality.