get past (someone or something)

(redirected from gotten past)
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get past (someone or something)

1. To be able to pass an obstacle. We'll never be able to get past that overturned truck up ahead.
2. To move someone or something past an obstacle. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "get" and "past." Good luck getting a shot past their stellar defense.
3. To be able to move ahead of someone or something. Ugh, this guy is walking so slowly—let's try to get past him. Make sure you get past this truck soon, or we'll be stuck behind it the whole way home.
4. To be able to overcome or overlook something that has happened. I'm sorry, but I'll never be able to get past the fact that Robert cheated on you. Not all couples can get past something like infidelity.
5. To cause or help someone to overcome or overlook something that has happened. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "get" and "past." Therapy got me past those dark times.
6. To manage to hide something from someone else. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "get" and "past." I'm not surprised mom found out about you sneaking in after curfew—you know you can't get anything past her.
See also: get, past
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

get something past

 (someone or something)
1. Lit. to move something around or ahead of someone or something that is in the way. Let's get the piano past the bump in the floor, then we'll figure out how to move it farther. See if you can get the ball past their goalie by shooting high.
2. Fig. to get someone or a group to approve something; to work something through a bureaucracy. Do you think we can get this past the censors? I will never get this size increase past the board.
See also: get, past

get past

 (someone or something)
1. to move around or ahead of someone or something that is in the way. We have to get past the cart that is blocking the hallway. We just couldn't get past.
2. to pass ahead of someone or something that is moving. I want to get past this truck, then we can get into the right lane. When we get past, I'll stop and let you drive.
See also: get, past
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

get past

v.
1. To reach the other side of something: It was raining hard, but once we got past the floodplains, we felt safer.
2. To cause something to reach the other side of something: If you can get the supplies past the guards, the prisoners can take them and no one will notice.
3. To overcome something; no longer need to deal with something: Your advice helped me get past my problems.
4. To cause someone to overcome some obstacle: The cash advance got me past the winter.
See also: get, past
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
I just find myself wanting to experience the closeness of the animal and know that I've gotten past at least some of his senses.
Once you've gotten past the primary choices of lender, the loan amount, the rate structure and the basic terms, there are still many secondary points that will need to be dealt with correctly.
Bush's "No Child Left Behind" act would never have gotten past the Senate, nor would numerous other unconstitutional acts of Congress since 1913 that have sent centralized federal power sky rocketing, if the Senate actually represented the state governments.
Linn admits that while they have struggled with that, he points out, "We've gotten past that with robots for some time now." Linn explains, "The way our financial people allocate funds for programs, you're looking at making an investment for multiple programs--amortizing those costs over multiple programs."
Invisible but always there, behind the extraordinarily excellent states, apparently irreversible, definitive, there is a sudden unveiling of the very, very bad states which you don't want, or of the chaotic, the bizarre, the extravagant you thought you had gotten past.
I resent the dismissal of this as something to be gotten past in favor of fitting into a homogenized society.
Paul Klebnikov, who (perhaps wisely) does not live in Moscow, did not qualify for the competition, but he would hardly have gotten past the first round.
Other Mexican homebuilders have looked at setting up similar programs for maquiladoras, but haven't gotten past the planning stage.
For the most part, they have gotten past the mindless bluster ("We can't do that!