get cold feet

(redirected from gotten cold feet)

get cold feet

To experience nervousness or anxiety before one attempts to do something, often to the extent that one tries to avoid it. I wasn't nervous until the morning of my wedding, but everyone assured me that I had just gotten cold feet. Good luck getting her out on stage—she always gets cold feet before a performance.
See also: cold, feet, get
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

cold feet, get

Also, have cold feet. Retreat from an undertaking; lose one's nerve. For example, I got cold feet when I learned the trip involves white-water rafting, or Don't count on including her-she's been known to have cold feet in the past. The origin of this term has been lost. In early 17th-century Italy it meant to be short of money, but that sense has never been used in English. [Late 1800s]
See also: cold, get
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

get cold feet

or

have cold feet

COMMON If you get cold feet or have cold feet about something you have planned to do, you become nervous about it and not sure that you want to do it. My boyfriend got cold feet about being in a committed relationship. Leaving Ireland wasn't easy and I had cold feet about it a couple of times.
See also: cold, feet, get
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

get/have cold ˈfeet

(informal) no longer want to continue what you intended or have started to do because you are nervous or afraid: Do you still want to do this parachute jump or are you getting cold feet? OPPOSITE: take the plunge
See also: cold, feet, get, have
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

cold feet, to get/have

To be timid; to back off from some undertaking. This expression appears to date from the nineteenth century, at least in its present meaning. In the early seventeenth century it was an Italian proverb that meant to have no money; it was so used by Ben Jonson in his play Volpone. The source of the more recent meaning is obscure. Some believe it comes from soldiers retreating in battle because their feet are frozen. Another source cites a German novel of 1862 in which a card player withdraws from a game because, he claims, his feet are cold.
See also: cold, get, have, to
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
It didn't help that some insiders began to retroactively whisper that, even before they got married, Amber had gotten cold feet about the huge decision she was making to marry a much older man.
Trade officials signed off on the deal on July n But Canadian lumber executives--who have to approve the deal for it to take effect in Canada--have gotten cold feet. Since the deal was first announced, two U.S.
The troubled production, estimated at $60 to $80 million U.S., has gotten cold feet about a daunting mid-winter shoot on the Rock.
Previous '80s-artist-becomes-filmmaker vehicles (David Salle's Search and Destroy, Robert Longo's Johnny Mnemonic) had been poor precedents at best, and long delays in scheduling the screening had led me and others to speculate that the film's distributor, Miramax, had gotten cold feet; but I left Basquiat (a flat-footed retitling of Schnabel's original Build a Fort, Set It on Fire) with a peculiar sense of pleasure and/or relief.