get over it

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get over

1. To recover or heal from some physical or mental ailment. It took her nearly four months to get over that bout of pneumonia. I'd love to play rugby again, but I've been getting over a broken ankle.
2. To accept, feel better about, move on from, or come to terms with something, especially that which has already been established or has happened in the past. John is still getting over his divorce, so he's been a little distant at work. I don't think I'll ever get over losing my job like that. You need to get over the fact that I'm moving to Indonesia next month.
3. To overcome or find the solution to a problem, obstacle, or difficulty. We've had to get over a lot of technical setbacks, but our new website is finally up and running.
4. To no longer feel heartbroken over or lovesick for someone. It's been nearly a year since Janet dumped me, but I still haven't gotten over her. Oh, Sarah, it's just a crush. You'll get over Tommy soon enough.
5. In rugby, to pass the opponent's goal line and touch the ball to the ground in order to score a try. The team managed to get over in the final seconds of the game, securing a thrilling 21–20 victory.
See also: get, over

get over it

To move on and accept things the way they are; to stop being concerned by or with something that is in the past or can't be changed. Often used as an imperative. Look, I'm going to marry him whether you want me to or not. Get over it! She left you over three years ago, so you really need to get over it already!
See also: get, over
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

Get over it!

Forget about it and be done with it! (Said to someone who is fretting and stewing over some kind of problem.) Forget about her. She's gone. Get over it!
See also: get, over
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

get over it

Forget your loss or disappointment, move on. A slangy imperative similar to get a life, its use dates from about 1990. Since then it has become the title of a motion picture (2001) and a popular song. It is derived from the idioms “to get over something,” meaning to recover from an illness (“He just got over the flu”) or to overcome or surmount something (“We’ve got to get over these racial prejudices”), which date from the late 1600s.
See also: get, over
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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